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Đọc tiếng anh 3

Đọc – Tiếng Anh 3 – EN28
Read the passage below and answer the questions.
CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

A Appointments

Please telephone 826969 (8.30am – 5.00pm: Mon – Fri). We suggest that you
try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you
and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments
running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you
cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as
possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening
appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask
for a longer appointment if you need more time.

B Weekends and Nights

Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of
the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our

normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency
surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home
visits before 10.00am at weekends.

C Centre Nurses

Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment
to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations,


removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and
can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s
unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three
Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health
checks on patients who have been on doctors’ lists for 3 years.

D New Patients

Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular
medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients
can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.

E Services Not Covered

Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance,
driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and
prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the
National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.

F Receptionists

Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact – they are all very
experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be
able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of
the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness – this
enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.

G Change of Address



Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us
to have a record of your telephone number

Question: If you want a repeat prescription you must make an appointment.

NOT GIVEN
Question: Services of private certificates are covered by Caustion Health Centre.
Chọn một câu trả lời:

FALSE
Read the passage below and answer the questions.
CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

A Appointments

Please telephone 826969 (8.30am – 5.00pm: Mon – Fri). We suggest that you
try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you
and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments
running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you
cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as
possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening
appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask
for a longer appointment if you need more time.

B Weekends and Nights


Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of
the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our
normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency
surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home
visits before 10.00am at weekends.

C Centre Nurses

Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment
to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations,
removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and
can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s
unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three
Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health
checks on patients who have been on doctors’ lists for 3 years.

D New Patients

Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular
medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients
can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.

E Services Not Covered

Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance,
driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and
prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the
National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.


F Receptionists

Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact – they are all very
experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be
able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of
the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness – this
enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.

G Change of Address

Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us
to have a record of your telephone number

Which section contains the following information?

…………. what to do if you need to cancel a doctor’s appointment

Section A
Vì: ―if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as
soon as possible ―

Read the passage below and answer the questions.
CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

A Appointments


Please telephone 826969 (8.30am – 5.00pm: Mon – Fri). We suggest that you
try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you
and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments
running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you
cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as
possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening
appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask
for a longer appointment if you need more time.

B Weekends and Nights

Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of
the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our
normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency
surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home
visits before 10.00am at weekends.

C Centre Nurses

Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment
to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations,
removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and
can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s
unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three
Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health
checks on patients who have been on doctors’ lists for 3 years.

D New Patients


Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular
medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients
can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.

E Services Not Covered

Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance,
driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and
prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the
National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.

F Receptionists

Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact – they are all very
experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be
able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of
the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness – this
enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.

G Change of Address

Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us
to have a record of your telephone number

Which section contains the following information?

…………. what happens when you register with the Centre


Section D
Vì: ―Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular
medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor‖

Read the passage below and answer the questions.
CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET

A Appointments

Please telephone 826969 (8.30am – 5.00pm: Mon – Fri). We suggest that you
try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you
and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments
running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you
cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as
possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening
appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask
for a longer appointment if you need more time.

B Weekends and Nights

Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of
the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our
normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency
surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home
visits before 10.00am at weekends.

C Centre Nurses


Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment
to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations,
removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and
can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s
unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three
Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health
checks on patients who have been on doctors’ lists for 3 years.

D New Patients

Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular
medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients
can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.

E Services Not Covered

Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance,
driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and
prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the
National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.

F Receptionists

Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact – they are all very
experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be
able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of
the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness – this
enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.


G Change of Address

Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us
to have a record of your telephone number.

Which section contains the following information?

…………. what to do if you need help outside normal working hours

Section B
Question: You must always see the same doctor if you visit the Centre.
FALSE
Question: It is possible that receptionists will ask you to explain your problem.
TRUE
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.

Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some


dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.


―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: The more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner,
the more ———- its outlook appeared to be.

Chọn một câu trả lời:
a. Happy
b. Optimistic
c. Glad
d. Gloomy

Gloomy
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.


Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.


―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: Which of these dogs are more likely to be optimistic, according to the
study?

Chọn một câu trả lời:
a. ones that relieved themselves
b. ones that bark when left alone
c. ones that destroy furniture when left alone
d. ones that remain calm when left alone Câu trả lời đúng

ones that remain calm when left alone
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.


Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected


to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.

―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: How do owners respond to anxious behaviour in dogs?

Chọn một câu trả lời:
a. They think the dog is being intentionally spiteful.
b. They take the dog to a refuge.
c. They ignore the dog.
d. They react in different ways.

They react in different ways
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to


life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.

Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.


The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.

―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: When did the researchers video the dogs?

Chọn một câu trả lời:
a. when the dogs were left alone for twenty minutes
b. while they were playing with them
c. when the dogs were left alone for five minutes Câu trả lời đúng
d. when the dogs were walking over to the food bowls
Phản hồi
Đáp án đúng là: when the dogs were left alone for five minutes

Vì:‖left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the
animal’s behaviour with a video camera.‖

when the dogs were left alone for five minutes


Vì:‖left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the
animal’s behaviour with a video camera.‖

Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.

Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.


Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.

―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: Film of a particular subject or event _________________________.

Chọn một câu trả lời:

footage


. ambiguous
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists

Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.

Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s


behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.

A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.

―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: If something is described as _________________________, it is not
clear or it is capable of being understood in more than one way.

concerned
Vì: trong ngữ cảnh này concerned =worried

Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.
Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientists


Scientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some
dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into
canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into
how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally
calm when left alone were also found to have a ―dog bowl half full‖ attitude to
life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture
appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.

Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the
more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy
its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some
dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could
be treated with behavioural therapy.

―Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs.
Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think
the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,‖ said Mendl. ―At least
some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners
to talk to their vets about potential treatments,‖ he added. Of the ten million pet
dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the
researchers said.

Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs
were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers,
golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old.
Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and
playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog
alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s
behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an
anxiety score.


A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was
full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other.
When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’
underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of
the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.

The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach
food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected
to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying
they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.

―We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy
people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,‖ Mendl said.
―What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glasshalf-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more
pessimistic nature.‖ Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals
department at the RSPCA, said: ―Some dogs may be more prone to develop
these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.‖

Question: If you feel _________________________, you are worried about
something.

Question: Which dogs were slowest to approach the food bowls?
the ones that had been the most anxious in the previous test
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.
According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are
survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of
survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read
and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have
uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly
as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of


your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your
feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an
alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you
can find them in the dark if necessary.

In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your
hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a
complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low
and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for
added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible,
follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not
jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so
with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground,
you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke
near the wreckage.

Choose the best answer.

According to the passage, airline travelers should keep their feet flat on the
floor…………..

during takeoffs and landings.
No fee
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.
Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College
Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about
fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average
rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It’s easy to find out.
Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it’s all
here for you.


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