Tải bản đầy đủ

Castle craneycrow

TheProjectGutenbergEBookofCastleCraneycrow,byGeorgeBarrMcCutcheon
ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith
almostnorestrictionswhatsoever.Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor
re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded
withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org

Title:CastleCraneycrow
Author:GeorgeBarrMcCutcheon
ReleaseDate:March,2004[EBook#5349]
ThisfilewasfirstpostedonJuly6,2002
LastUpdated:March12,2018
Language:English

***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKCASTLECRANEYCROW***

ProducedbyCharlesAldarondoandDavidWidger


CASTLECRANEYCROW
ByGeorgeBarrMcCutcheon
NEWYORK

1902

CONTENTS
CASTLECRANEYCROW
I.THETAKINGOFTURK
II.SOMERAINANDITSCONSEQUENCES
III.PRINCEUGO
IV.ANDTHEGIRL,TOO
V.ASUNDAYENCOUNTER
VI.DOROTHYGARRISON
VII.THEWOMANFROMPARIS
VIII.THEFATEOFALETTER
IX.MOTHERANDDAUGHTER
X.TWOINATRAP
XI.FROMTHEPOTSANDPLANTS
XII.HECLAIMEDADAY


XIII.SOMEUGLYLOOKINGMEN
XIV.ADINNERANDADUEL
XV.APPROACHOFTHECRISIS
XVI.THECOURAGEOFACOWARD
XVII.AFEWMENANDAWOMAN
XVIII.ARRIVALSFROMLONDON
XIX.THEDAYOFTHEWEDDING
XX.WITHSTRANGECOMPANIONS
XXI.THEHOMEOFTHEBRIGANDS
XXII.CASTLECRANEYCROW
XXIII.HISONLY
XXIV.THEWHITEFLAG
XXV.DOWNAMONGTHEGHOSTS
XXVI.“THEKINGOFEVIL-DOERS”
XXVII.THEFLIGHTWITHTHEPRIEST
XXVIII.THEGAMEOFTHEPRIEST
XXIX.DOROTHY'SSOLUTION
XXX.LOVEISBLIND
XXXI.HERWAY


CASTLECRANEYCROW




I.THETAKINGOFTURK
ItwascharacteristicofMr.PhilipQuentinthathefirstlecturedhisservanton
the superiority of mind over matter and then took him cheerfully by the throat
andthrewhimintoafarcorneroftheroom.Astheservantwasnotmorethan
half the size of the master, his opposition was merely vocal, but it was
neverthelessunmistakable.Hisearlycareerhadincreasedhisvocabularyandhis
language was more picturesque than pretty. Yet of his loyalty and faithfulness,
there could be no doubt. During the seven years of his service, he had been
obligedtoforgetthathepossessedsuchanameasTurkingtonorevenJames.He
had been Turk from the beginning, and Turk he remained—and, in spite of
occasionaloutbreaks,hehadprovedhisdevotiontotheyounggentlemanwhose
goodsandchattelsheguardedwithmoreassiduitythanhedidhisownsoulor—
whatmeantmoretohim—hispersonalcomfort.Hisemploymentcameaboutin
anunusualway.Mr.Quentinhadanapartmentinasmartbuildinguptown.One
night he was awakened by a noise in his room. In the darkness he saw a man
fumblingamonghisthings,andinaninstanthehadseizedhisrevolverfromthe
standathisbedsideandcoveredtheintruder.Thenhecalmlydemanded:“Now,
whatareyoudoinghere?”
“I'mlookin'foraboardin'house,”repliedtheother,sullenly.
“You'rejustaplainthief—that'sall.”
“Well, it won't do me no good to say I'm a sleepwalker, will it?—er a
missionary,eradream?But,ond'dead,sport,I'mhungry,an'Iwuztryin'togit
enoughtobuyamealan'abed.Ond'dead,Iwuz.”
“Andasuitofclothes,andanovercoat,andahouseandlot,Isuppose,and
pleasedon'tcallme'sport'again.Sitdown—notohthefloor;onthatchairover
there. I'm going to search you. Maybe you've got something I need.” Mr.
Quentin turned on the light and proceeded to disarm the man, piling his
miserableeffectsonachair.“Takeoffthatmask.Lord!putitonagain;youlook
muchbetter.So,you'rehungry,areyou?”
“Asabear.”
Quentin never tried to explain his subsequent actions; perhaps he had had a
stupid evening. He merely yawned and addressed the burglar with all possible
respect. “Do you imagine I'll permit any guest of mine to go away hungry? If
you'llwaittillIdress,we'llstrollovertoarestaurantinthenextstreetandget


somesupper.
“Policestation,youmean.”
“Now, don't be unkind, Mr. Burglar. I mean supper for two. I'm hungry
myself,butnotabitsleepy.Willyouwait?”
“Oh,I'minnoparticularhurry.”
Quentindressedcalmly.Theburglarbeganwhistlingsoftly.
“Areyouready?”askedPhilip,puttingonhisovercoatandhat.
“Ihaven'tgotmeovercoatonyet,”repliedtheburglar,suggestively.Quentin
sawhewasdressedinthechilliestofrags.Heopenedaclosetdoorandthrew
himalongcoat.
“Ah,hereisyourcoat.Imusthavetakenitfromtheclubbymistake.Pardon
me.”
“T'anks;I neverexpectedtogit itback,”coollyreplied the burglar, donning
thebestcoat thathadevertouchedhis person. “Youdidn'tsee anything ofmy
glovesandhatinthere,didyou?”Ahatandapairofgloveswereproduced,not
perfectinfit,butquiterespectable.
Soberly they walked out into the street and off through the two-o'clock
stillness. The mystified burglar was losing his equanimity. He could not
understandthecaptor'smotive,norcouldhemuchlongercurbhiscuriosity.In
hismindhewasfullysatisfiedthathewaswalkingstraighttotheportalsofthe
nearest station. In all his career as a housebreaker, he had never before been
caught,andnowtobecapturedinsuchawayandtreatedinsuchawaywasfar
pastcomprehension.Tenminutesbeforehewaslookingatastalwartfigurewith
aleveledrevolver,confidentlyexpectingtodropwiththebulletinhisbodyfrom
anagitatedweapon.Indeed,heencounteredconditionssostrangethathefelta
doubtoftheirreality.Hehad,forsomepeculiarandamazingreason,nodesireto
escape. There was something in the oddness of the proceeding that made him
wishtoseeittoanend.Besides,hewasquitesurethestrappingyoungfellow
wouldshootifheattemptedtobolt.
“This is a fairly good eating house,” observed the would-be victim as they
cametoan“all-nighter.”Theyenteredanddeliberatelyremovedtheircoats,the
thiefwatchinghishostwithshifty,eventwinklingeyes.“Whatshallitbe,Mr.
Robber?Youarehungry,andyoumayordertheentirebill,fromsouptothedate
line,ifyoulike.Pitchin.”
“Say, boss, what's your game?” demanded the crook, suddenly. His sharp,
pinchedface,withitsweek'sgrowthofbeard,woreanewexpression—thatof


admiration. “I ain't such a rube that I don't like a good t'ing even w'en it ain't
comin'myway.You'seadandy,dat'sright,an'It'inkwe'ddowellindebusiness
togedder.Putmenex'toyergame.”
“Game?Thebilloffaretellsyouallaboutthat.Here'squail,squab,duck—
see?That'stheonlygameI'minterestedin.Goon,andorder.”
“S''elpmeGawdifyouain'tapeach.”
For half an hour Mr. Burglar ate ravenously, Quentin watching him through
half-closed,amusedeyes.Hehadhadadull,monotonousweek,andthiswasthe
noveltythatliftedlifeoutofthetorpidityintowhichithadfallen.
Thehostatthisqueerfeastwasatthattimelittlemorethantwenty-fiveyears
ofage,ayearoutofYale,andjustbackfromasecondtourofSouthAmerica.
He was an orphan, coming into a big fortune with his majority, and he had
satiatedanolddesiretotravelinlandsnotvisitedbyalltheworld.Nowhewas
backinNewYorktolookaftertheinvestmentshisguardianhadmade,andhe
foundthemsoridiculouslysatisfactorythattheycastashadowofdullnessacross
hismind,alwayshungryforactivity.
“Haveyouaplacetosleep?”heasked,atlength.
“IliveinJerseyCity,butIsupposeIcanfindacheaplodgin'housedownby
d'river.Troubleis,Iain'tgotd'price.”
“Thencomebackhomewithme.YoumaysleepinJackson'sroom.Jackson
was my man till yesterday, when I dismissed him for stealing my cigars and
drinkingmydrinks.Iwon'thaveanybodyaboutmewhosteals.Comealong.”
ThentheywalkedswiftlybacktoQuentin'sflat.Theowneroftheapartment
directedhispuzzledguesttoasmallroomoffhisown,andtoldhimtogotobed.
“Bytheway,what'syourname?”heasked,beforeheclosedthedoor.
“Turkington—James Turkington, sir,” answered the now respectful robber.
Andhewantedtosaymore,buttheotherinterrupted.
“Well,Turk,whenyougetupinthemorning,polishthoseshoesofmineover
there.We'lltalkitoverafterI'vehadmybreakfast.Good-night.”
AndthatishowTurk,mostfaithfulandloyalofservants,beganhisapparently
endless employment with Mr. Philip Quentin, dabbler in stocks, bonds and
hearts. Whatever his ugly past may have been, whatever his future may have
promised,hewashonesttoapainfuldegreeinthesedayswithQuentin.Quickwitted,fiery,willfulandasuglyasalittledemon,Turkknewnolaw,nointegrity
except that which benefitted his employer. Beyond a doubt, if Quentin had
instructedhimtobutcherascoreofmen,Turkwouldhaveproceededtodoso


andwithoutargument.ButQuentininstructedhimtobehonest,law-abidingand
cautious.Itwouldbeperfectlysafetoguesshisagebetweenfortyandsixty,but
itwouldnotbewisetomeasurehisstrengthbythesizeofhisbody.Thelittleexburglarwaslikeapieceofsteel.


II.SOMERAINANDITSCONSEQUENCES
NewYorkhadneverbeensonastyandcoldanddisagreeable.Forthreeweeks
ithadrained—asteady,chillingdrizzle.Quentinstooditaslongashecould,but
theweatherisalargefactorinthelifeofagentlemanofleisure.Hecouldn'tplay
Squash the entire time, and Bridge he always maintained was more of a
profession than a pastime. So it was that one morning, as he looked out at the
sheetsofwaterblowingacrossthecity,hismindwasmadeup.
“We'llgetoutofthis,Turk.I'vehadenoughofit.”
“Wheredowego,sir?”calmlyaskedtheservant.
“Heaven knows! But be ready to start tomorrow. We'll go somewhere and
dodgethisblesseddownpour.Callmeacab.”
As he drove to the club, he mentally tossed coppers as to his destination.
PeoplewerealreadycomingbackfromAikenandPalmBeach,andthosewho
had gone to the country were cooped up indoors and shivering about the
fireplaces.Wherecouldhego?Asheenteredtheclubamanhailedhimfromthe
frontroom.
“Quentin,you'rejustthemanI'mlookingfor.Comeinhere.”
It was the Earl of Saxondale—familiarly “Lord Bob”—an old chum of
Quentin's.“Mymissussentmewithaninvitationforyou,andI'vecomeforyour
acceptance,”saidtheEnglishman,whenQuentinhadjoinedhim.
“Comehomewithus.We'resailingontheLucaniato-morrow,andthereare
goingtobesomedoingsinEnglandthismonthwhichyoumustn'tmiss.Dickey
Savageiscoming,andwewantyou.”
Quentinlookedathimandlaughed.Saxondalewasperfectlyserious.“We're
goingtohavesomepeopleupforGoodwood,andlaterweshallhaveahouseboatforHenley.Soyou'dbettercome.Itwon'tbebadsport.”
Quentinstartedtothankhisfriendanddecline.Thenherememberedthathe
wanted to get away—there was absolutely nothing to keep him at home, and,
besides,helikedLordBobandhisAmericanwife.
Fashionable New York recalls the marriage of the Earl of Saxondale and
FrancesThornowwhenthe'90'swereyoung,andeverybodysaiditwasalove
match.Tobesure,shewaswealthy,butsowashe.Shehaddeclinedoffersofa
half-dozenothernoblemen;thereforeitwasnotambitiononherpart.Hecould


have married any number of wealthier American girls; therefore it was not
avariceonhispart.Hewasagood-looking,stalwartchapwithaveryfetching
drawl,infinitegentility,andamandespitehismonocle,whileshewasbeautiful,
wittyandwomanly;thereforeitisreasonabletosuspectthatitmusthavebeen
lovethatmadeherLadySaxondale.
Lord Bob and Lady Frances were frequent visitors to New York. He liked
NewYork,andNewYorkerslikedhim.HiswifewasenoughofatrueAmerican
to love the home of her forefathers. “What my wife likes I seem to have a
fondnessfor,”saidhe,complacently.Heonceremarkedthatwereshetofallin
lovewithanothermanhewouldfeelindutyboundtolikehim.
Saxondale had money invested in American copper mines, and his wife had
railroadstocks.WhentheycametoNewYork,onceortwiceayear,theytooka
furnishedapartment,entertainedandwereentertainedforamonthorso,rushed
their luggage back to the steamer and sailed for home, perfectly satisfied with
themselvesand—themarkets.
Quentin looked upon Lord Bob's invitation as a sporting proposition. This
wouldnotbethefirsttimehehadtakenasteamerontwenty-fourhours'notice.
The onequestionwasaccommodation,andalongacquaintancewith the agent
helpedhimtogetpassagewhereotherswouldhavefailed.
So it happened that the next morning Turk was unpacking things in Mr.
Quentin'scabinandestablishingrelationswiththebathsteward.


III.PRINCEUGO
SeveraldaysoutfromNewYorkfoundtheweatherfineandLordSaxondale's
partyenjoyinglifethoroughly.DickeyandthecapriciousLadyJanewerebright
orsquallywithcharminguncertainty.LadyJane,LordBob'ssister,certainlywas
notinlovewithMr.Savage,andhewastooindolenttogivehissideofthecase
continuousthought.Dimlyherealized,andoncelugubriouslyadmitted,thathe
wasnotquiteheartwhole,buthehadnotreachedapositiveunderstandingwith
himself.
“How do they steer the ship at night when it is so cloudy they can't see the
northstar?”sheasked,astheyleanedovertherailoneafternoon.Herprettyface
wasveryserious,andtherewasaphilosophicalpuckeronherbrow.
“Witharudder,”heanswered,laconically.
“How very odd!” she said, with a malicious gleam in her eyes. “You are as
wonderfullywell-informedconcerningtheseaasyouareonallothersubjects.
Howgooditmustseemtobesoawfullyintelligent.”
“It isn't often that I find anyone who asks really intelligent questions, you
know, Lady Jane. Your profound quest for knowledge forced my dormant
intellect into action, and I remembered that a ship invariably has a rudder or
somethinglikethat.”
“I see it requires the weightiest of questions to arouse your intellect.” The
windwasblowingthestrayhairsruthlesslyacrossherfaceandshelookedvery,
verypretty.
“Intellects are so very common nowadays that 'most anything will arouse
them.QuentinsayshismanTurkhasabrain,andifTurkhasabrainIdon'tsee
howtherestofuscanescape.I'dliketobeaporpoise.”
“Whatanambition!Whynotawhaleorashark?”
“If I were a shark you'd be afraid of me, and if I were a whale I could not
begintogetintoyourheart.”
“That'sthebestthingyou'vesaidsinceyouwereseasick,”shesaid,sweetly.
“I'mgladyoudidn'thearwhatIsaidwhenIwasseasick.”
“Oh!I'veheardbrotherBobsaythings,”loftily.
“ButnobodycansaythingsquitesoimpressivelyasanAmerican.”


“Pooh! You boasting Americans think you can do everything better than
others.Nowyouclaimthatyoucanswearbetter.Iwon'tlistentoyou,”andoff
shewenttowardthecompanionway.Dickeylookedmildlysurprised,butdidnot
follow.Instead,hejoinedLadySaxondaleandQuentininastroll.
FourdayslatertheywerecomfortablyestablishedwithSaxondaleinLondon.
ThatnightQuentinmet,forthefirsttime,thereigningsocietysensation,Prince
UgoRavorelli,andhiscountrymen,CountSallaconiandtheDukeofLaselli.All
Londonhadgonemadovertheprince.
There was something oddly familiar in the face and voice of the Italian.
Quentinsatwithhimforanhour,listeningwithpuzzledearstotheconversation
that went on between him and Saxondale. On several occasions he detected a
curious, searching look in the Italian's dark eyes, and was convinced that the
princealsohadtheimpressionthattheyhadmetbefore.AtlastQuentin,unable
tocurbhiscuriosity,expressedhisdoubt.Ravorelli'sgazewaspenetratingashe
replied,butitwasperfectlyfrank.
“Ihavethefeelingthatyourfaceisnotstrangetome,yetIcannotrecallwhen
orwhereIhaveseenyou.HaveyoubeeninParisoflate?”heasked,hisEnglish
almost perfect.Itseemed to Quentin thattherewasa lookof reliefin hisdark
eyes, and there was a trace of satisfaction in the long breath that followed the
question.
“No,” he replied; “I seem in some way to associate you with Brazil and the
SouthAmericancities.WereyoueverinRioJaneiro?”
“I have never visited either of the Americas. We are doubtless misled by a
strange resemblance to persons we know quite well, but who do not come to
mind.”
“Butisn'titratheroddthatweshouldhavethesamefeeling?Andyouhave
notbeeninNewYork?”persistedPhil.
“I have not beeninAmericaat all,youmust remember,”repliedthe prince,
coldly.
“I'd stake my soul on it,” thought Quentin to himself, more fully convinced
than ever. “I've seen him before and more than once, too. He remembers me,
eventhoughIcan'tplacehim.It'sdevilishaggravating,buthisfaceisasfamiliar
asifIsawhimyesterday.”
When they parted for the night Ravorelli's glance again impressed the
American with a certainty that he, at least, was not in doubt as to where and
whentheyhadmet.


“You are trying to recall where we have seen one another,” said the prince,
smilingeasily,hiswhiteteethshowingclearlybetweensmoothlips.“Mycousin
visited America some years ago, and there is a strong family resemblance.
Possiblyyouhaveourfacesconfused.”
“Thatmaybethesolution,”admittedPhil,buthewasbynomeanssatisfied
bythehypothesis.
Inthecab,lateron,LordBobwasstartledfromabitofdozebyhearinghis
thoughtful,abstractedcompanionexclaim:
“Bythunder!”
“What's up? Forgot your hat, or left something at the club?” he demanded,
sleepily.
“No; I remember something, that's all. Bob, I know where I've seen that
Italian prince. He was in Rio Janeiro with a big Italian opera company just
beforeIleftthereforNewYork.”
“What!Buthesaidhe'dneverbeeninAmerica,”exclaimedSaxondale,wide
awake.
“Well,helied,that'sall.Iampositivehe'stheman,andthebestproofinthe
world is the certainty that he remembers me. Of course he denies it, but you
know what he said when I first asked him if we had met. He was the tenor in
Pagani'soperacompany,andhesanginseveralofthebigSouthAmericancities.
TheywereinRioJaneiroforweeks,andwelivedinthesamehotel.There'sno
mistakeaboutit,oldman.Thishowlingswellofto-daywasPagani'stenor,and
he was a good one, too. Gad, what a Romeo he was! Imagine him in the part,
Bob.Lord,howthewomenravedabouthim!”
“Isay,Phil,don'tbeassenoughtotellanybodyelseaboutthis,evenifyou're
cocksure he's the man. He was doubtless driven to the stage for financial
reasons,youknow,anditwouldn'tbequiterighttobringitupnowifhehasa
desiretosuppressthetruth.Sincehehascomeintothetitleandestatesitmight
bedeucedawkwardtohavethatsortofapastrakedup.”
“Ishouldsayitwouldbeawkwardifthatpartofhispastwererakedup.He
wasn'taPuritan,Bob.”
“Theyareabitscarceatbest.”
“HewasknowninthosedaysasGiovanniPavesi,andhewasn'tinsuchdire
financialstraits,either.Itwashis moneythat backedtheenterprise,anditwas
commonproperty,undeniedbyhimoranyoneelse,thatthechiefobjectinthe
speculationwastheloveoftheprimadonna,CarmenitaMalban.And,Bob,she


wasthemostbeautifulwomanIeversaw.Thestorywasthatshewasacountess
orsomethingofthesort.Povertyforcedhertomakeuseofagloriousvoice,and
thedevilsentPaganitoyoungPavesi,whowasthenastudentwithsomeripping
bigmaster,inthehopethathewouldinteresttheyoungmaninaschemetotour
SouthAmerica.ItseemsthatSignoritaMalban'sbeautysethisheartonfire,and
hepromptlyproducedthecointobacktheenterprise,theonlyconditionbeing
thathewastosingthetenorroles.Allthiscameoutinthetrial,youknow.”
“Thetrial!Whattrial?”
“Giovanni's.Letmethinkaminute.Shewaskilledonthe29thofMarch,and
hewasnotarresteduntiltheyhadvirtuallyconvictedoneofthechorusmenof
the murder. Pagani and Pavesi quarrelled, and the former openly accused his
'angel'ofthecrime.Thisledtoanarrestjustasthetenorwasgettingawayona
shipboundforSpain.”
“Arrestedhimforthemurderofthewoman?Onmylife,Quentin,youmakea
seriousblunderunlessyoucanproveallthis.Whendiditallhappen?”
“Twoyearsago.Oh,I'mnotmistakenaboutit;itisasclearassunlighttome
now. They took him back and tried him. Members of the troupe swore he had
threatenedonnumerousoccasionstokillherifshecontinuedtorepulsehim.On
the night of the murder—it was after the opera—he was heard to threaten her.
Shedefiedhim,andoneofthewomeninthecompanytestifiedthathesoughtto
intimidateMalbanbyplacingthepointofhisstilettoagainstherwhiteneck.But,
inspiteofallthis,hewasacquitted.IwasinNewYorkwhenthetrialended,but
Ireadoftheverdictinthepressdispatches.Someonekilledher,thatiscertain,
and the nasty job was done in her room at the hotel. I heard some of the
evidence,andI'llsaythatIbelievedhewastheguiltyman,butIconsideredhim
insanewhenhecommittedthecrime.Helovedhertothepointofmadness,and
shewouldnotyieldtohispassion.Itwasshownthatshelovedthechorussinger
whowasfirstchargedwithhermurder.”
“Ravorellidoesn'tlooklikeamurderer,”saidLordBob,stoutly.
“Butheremembersseeingmeinthatcourtroom,Bob.”


IV.ANDTHEGIRL,TOO
“NowtellmeallaboutourItalianfriend,”saidQuentinnextmorningtoLady
Frances,whohadnotlostherfrankAmericanismwhenshemarriedLordBob,
Thehandsomefaceoftheyoungprincehadbeeninhisthoughtsthenightbefore
untilsleepcame,andthenthereweredreamsinwhichthesamefaceappeared
vaguely sinister and foreboding. He had acted on the advice of Lord Bob and
hadsaidnothingoftheBrazilianexperiences.
“Prince Ugo? I supposed that every newspaper in New York had been
devotingcolumnstohim.HeistomarryanAmericanheiress,andsomeofthe
Londonjournalssaysheissorichthateverybodyelselookspoorbesideher.”
“Lucky dog, eh? Everybody admires him, too, it seems. Do you know him,
Frances?”
“I'vemethimanumberoftimesonthecontinent,butnotofteninLondon.He
isseldomhere,youknow.Really,heisquiteacharmingfellow.”
“Yes,” laconically. “Are Italian princes as cheap as they used to be? Mary
Carroltongotthatnastylittleoneofhersfortwohundredthousand,didn'tshe?
This one looks as though he might come a little higher. He's good-looking
enough.”
“Oh,UgoisnotliketheCarroltoninvestment.Yousee,thisoneisvastlyrich,
and he's no end of a swell in sunny Italy. Really, the match is the best an
Americangirlhasmadeoverherein—oh,incenturies,Imaysay.”
“Pocahontasmadeafairlydecentone,Ibelieve,andsodidFrancesThornow;
but,tomylimitedknowledge,Ithinktheyaretheonlysatisfactorymatchesthat
have been pulled off in the last few centuries. Strange, they both married
Englishmen.”
“Thankyou.Youdon'tlikeItalianprinces,then?”
“Oh, if I could buy a steady, well-broken, tractable one, I'd take him as an
investment,perhaps,butIbelieve,onthewhole,I'dratherputthemoneyintoa
generalmenagerielikeBarnum'sorForepaugh's.Yougetsuchavarietyofbeasts
thatway,youknow.”
“Come, now, Phil, your sarcasm is unjust. Prince Ugo is very much of a
gentleman, and Bob says he is very clever, too. Did you see much of him last
night?”


“Isawhimattheclubandtalkedabitwithhim.ThenIsawhimwhileIslept.
Heismuchbetterintheclubthanheisinadream.”
“Youdreamedofhimlastnight?Hecertainlymadeanimpression,then,”she
said.
“I dreamed I saw him abusing a harmless, overworked and underfed little
monkeyonthestreetsofNewYork.”
“Howabsurd!”
“The monkey wouldn't climb up to the window of my apartment to collect
nickelsforthevilesthand-organmusicamaneverheard,eveninanightmare.”
“PhilQuentin,youaremanufacturingthatdreamasyousithere.Waittillyou
knowhimbetterandyouwilllikehim.”
“Hisfriends,too?Oneofthosechapslooksasifhemightthrowabombwith
beautifulaccuracy—theLaselliduke,Ithink.Come,now,Frances,you'lladmit
he'sanuglybrute,won'tyou?”
“Yes, you are quite right, and I can't say that the count impresses me more
favorably.”
“I'll stake my head the duke's ancestors were brigands or something equally
appalling. A couple of poor, foolish American girls elevate them both to the
positionofmoney-spenders-in-chiefthough,Ipresume,andthenewspaperswill
sizzle.”
At dinner that evening the discussion was resumed, all those at the table
takingpart.ThetallyoungAmericanwasplainlyprejudicedagainsttheItalian,
but his stand was a mystery to all save Lord Bob. Dickey Savage was
laboriously non-committal until Lady Jane took sides unequivocally with
Quentin.Thenhevigorouslydefendedtheunluckyprince.LadySaxondaleand
SirJamesGraham,oneoftheguests,tookpainstoplacetheItalianinthebest
lightpossiblebeforethecriticalAmerican.
“Ialmostforgottotellyou,Phil,”suddenlycriedLadySaxondale,herpretty
facebeamingwithexcitement.“Thegirlheistomarryisanoldflameofyours.”
“Quiteimpossible,LadyFrances.Ineverhadaflame.”
“Butshewas,I'msure.”
“Areyouatheosophist?”askedPhil,gaily,buthelistenednevertheless.Who
could she be? It seemed for the moment, as his mind swept backward, that he
had possessed a hundred sweethearts. “I've had no sweetheart since I began
existenceinthepresentform.”
“GoodLord!”ejaculatedDickey,solemnlyandimpressively.


“I'll bet my soul Frances is right,” drawled Lord Bob. “She always is, you
know.Myboy,ifshesaysyouhadasweetheart,youeitherhadoneorsomebody
owesyouone.You'venevercollected,perhaps.”
“Ifhecollectedthemhe'dhaveaharem,”observedMr.Savage,sagely.“He's
hadsomanyhecan'tcount'em.”
“Ishouldthinkitdisgustingtocountthem,Mr.Savage,evenifhecould,”said
LadyJane,severely.
“Icancountminebackwards,”hesaid.
“Beginningatone?”
“Yes, Lady Jane; one in my teens, none at present. No task, at all, to count
mine.”
“Won'tyougivemethenameofthatoldsweetheartofmine,LadySaxondale?
Whomistheprincetomarry?”askedQuentin.
“DorothyGarrison.Shelivedinyourblocksevenoreightyearsago,uptothe
timeshewenttoBrusselswithhermother.Now,doyouremember?”
“Youdon'tmeanit!LittleDorothy?ByGeorge,shewasaprettygirl,too.Of
course, I remember her. But that was ages ago. She was fourteen and I was
nineteen. Youare right,LadySaxondale.I'llconfessto havingregardedheras
thefairestcreaturethesunevershoneupon.Forsixsolid,deliciousmonthsshe
was the foundation of every thought that touched my brain. And then—well,
whathappenedthen?Oh,yes;wequarrelledandforgoteachother.Soshe'sthe
girl who's to marry the prince, is she?” Quentin's face was serious for the
moment; a far-off look of real concern came into his eyes. He was recalling a
sweet,daintyface,agirlishfigure,andthedaysgoneby.
“HowoddIdidnotthinkofitbefore.Really,youtwoweredreadfulspoonsin
those days. Mamma used to worry for fear you'd carry out your threat to run
awaywithher.Andnowshe'stobearealliveprincess.”LadyFrancescreateda
profoundsensationwhensheresurrectedQuentin'sboyhoodloveaffairwiththe
one American girl that all Europe talked about at that moment. Lord Bob was
excited,perhapsforthefirsttimesinceheproposedtoFrancesThornow.
“By Jove, old man, this is rare, devilish rare. No wonder you have such a
deucedantipathytotheprince.Intuitionmusthavetoldyouthathewastomarry
oneoftheladiesofyourpast.”
“Why, Bob, we were children, and there was nothing to it. Truly, I had
forgotten that pretty child—that's all she was—and I'll warrant she wouldn't
remembermynameifsomeonespokeitinherpresence.Everyboyandgirlhas


hadthatsortofanaffair.”
“She's the most beautiful creature I ever saw,” cried Lady Jane, ecstatically.
DickeySavagelookedsharplyathervivaciousface.“Whendidyoulastseeher,
Mr.Quentin?”
“Ican'trecall,butIknowitwaswhenherhairhungdownherback.Sheleft
New York before she was fifteen, I'm quite sure. I think I was in love with a
youngwidowfourteenyearsmysenior,atthetime,anddidnotpaymuchheed
toDorothy'sdeparture.Sheandhermotherhavebeentravelingsincethen?”
“TheytraveledforthreeyearsbeforeMrs.Garrisoncouldmakeuphermind
tosettledowninBrussels.IbelieveshesaiditremindedherofParis,onlyitwas
alittlemoreso,”saidLordBob.“WemettheminParisfiveyearsago,onour
weddingtrip,andshewasundecideduntilItoldhershemighttakeahousenear
theking'spalaceinBrussels,suchasitis,andoffsheflewtobeasclosetothe
crown as possible. She struck me as a gory old party who couldn't live
comfortably unless she were dabbling in blue blood. The girl was charming,
though.”
“She's in London now,” ventured Sir James. “The papers say she came
especiallytoseetheboatraces,butthereisaprettywellestablishedbeliefthat
shecamebecausetheprinceishere.Despitetheirmillions,Iunderstanditisa
lovematch.”
“IhopeImayhavealookatherwhileI'mhere,justtoseewhattimehasdone
forher,”saidQuentin.
“Youmayhavethechancetoaskifsheremembersyou,”saidDickey.
“Andifshethinksyou'vegrownolder,”addedLordBob.
“Willyoutellheryouarenotmarried?”demandedLadyJane.
“I'll do but one thing, judging from the way you describe the goddess. Just
standwithopenmouthandmarvelathermagnificence.Somewhereamongmy
trapsIhaveapictureofherwhenshewasfourteen,takenwithmeoneafternoon
atatin-typer's.IfIcanfindit,I'llshowittoher,justtoprovethatwebothlived
tenyearsago.She'sdoubtlesslivedsomuchsinceIsawherlastthatshe'lldeny
anexistencesofarbackasthat.”
“Youwon'tbesodeucedsarcasticwhenyouseeher,evenifsheistomarrya
prince. I tell you, Phil, she is something worth looking at forever,” said Lord
Bob.
“Ineversawsucheyes,suchacomplexion,suchhair,suchacarriage,”cried
LadyFrances.


“Hassheanyteeth?”askedDickey,andwasproperlyfrowneduponbyLady
Jane.
“Youdescribeherascompletelyinthatsentence,LadyFrances,asanovelist
couldineightpages,”saidQuentin.
“Nonovelistcoulddescribeher,”wastheanswer.
“It'stobehopednonovelistmayattemptit,”saidQuentin.“Sheisbeautiful
beyonddescription,shewillbeaprincess,andsheknewmewhenIdidn'tknow
enoughtoappreciateher.Hereyeswereblueintheolddays,andherhairwas
almostblack.Colorsstillobtain?Thenwehaveherdescriptioninadvance.Now,
let'sgoonwiththeromance.”


V.ASUNDAYENCOUNTER
It was a sunny Sunday morning and the church parade was popular. Lady
Frances and Quentin were walking together when Prince Ugo joined them. He
looked hardly over twenty-five, his wavy black hair giving him a picturesque
look.Heworenobeard,andhisdarkskinwasasclearasagirl's.
“By the way,” said Quentin, “Lady Saxondale tells me you are to marry a
formeracquaintanceofmine.”
“MissGarrisonisanacquaintance?”criedtheprince,liftinghisdarkeyes.An
instant later his gaze roamed away into the horde of passing women, as if
searchingforthewomanwhosenamebroughtlighttohissoul.
“Wasanacquaintance,IthinkIsaid.Idoubtifsheremembersmenow.She
was a child when I knew her. Is she here this morning?” asked Phil, secretly
amusedbytheanxiouslookintheItalian'seyes.
“ShewillbewithLadyMarnham,Ah,Iseethemnow.”Theyoungprincewas
lookingeagerlyahead.
Quentin saw Miss Garrison and gasped with astonishment. Could that
stunning young woman be the little Dorothy of New York days? He could
scarcely believe his eyes and ears, notwithstanding the introductions which
followed.
“AndhereisanoldNewYorkfriend.MissGarrison,Mr.PhilipQuentin.You
surelyrememberhim,MissGarrison,”saidLadyFrances,withapeculiargleam
in her eye. For a second the young lady at Quentin's side exhibited surprise; a
faint flush swept into her cheek, and then, with a rare smile, she extended her
handtotheAmerican.
“Ofcourse,Irememberhim.PhilandIwereplaymatesintheolddays.Dear
me,itseemsacenturyago,”shesaid.
“Icannottellyouhowwellthecenturyhastreatedyou,”hesaid,gallantly.“It
hasnotbeensokindtome.”
“Yearsareneverunkindtomen,”sheresponded.Shesmiledupontheadoring
prince and turned again to Quentin. “Tell me about New York, Phil. Tell me
aboutyourself.”
“I can only say that New York has grown larger and better, and that I have
grown older and worse. Mrs. Garrison may doubt that I could possibly grow


worse,butIhaveproofpositive.IamdabblinginWallstreet.”
“I can imagine nothing more reprehensible,” said Mrs. Garrison, amiably.
Quentinswiftlyrenewedhisopinionofthemother.Thatestimatecoincidedwith
theimpressionhisyouthhadformed,anditwasnotfarinthewrong.Herewas
the mother with a hope loftier than a soul. Purse-proud, ambitious,
condescendingtoadegree—awomanwhowouldachievewhatshesetouttodo
atallhazards.Lessthanfifty,stillhandsome,haughtyandarrogant,descended
through a long line of American aristocracy, calm, resourceful, heartless. For
fifteenyearsawidow,withnootherobjectthantoliveatthetopandtomarry
her only child into a realm far beyond the dreams of other American mothers.
Millions had she to flaunt in the faces of an astonished, marveling people.
Clever, tactful, aggressive, capable of winning where others had failed, this
American mother was respected, even admired, in the class to which she had
climbed.Herewasthewomanwhohadwonherwayintocontinentalsocietyas
havefewofhercountrywomen.Tononesaveacold,discerningmanfromher
ownlandwasshetransparent.LordBob,however,hadafaintconceptionofher
aims,hercapacity.
Astheywalkedon,QuentinscarcelytookhiseyesfromMissGarrison'sface.
He was wearing down the surprise that the sweetheart of his boyhood had
inspired, by deliberately seeking flaws in her beauty, her figure, her manner.
Afteratimehefelthermorewonderfulthanever.LordBobjoinedtheparty,and
Quentinstoppedasecondtospeaktohim.AshedidsoPrinceUgowasatMiss
Garrison'ssideinaninstant.
“So she is the girl that damned Italian is to elevate?” said Mr. Quentin to
himself. “By George, it's a shame!” He did not see Lord Bob and his wife
exchangeaquicksmileofsignificance.
Astheyallreachedthecorner,Quentinasked:“AreyouinLondonforlong,
Dorothy?”LadyFrancesthoughthistoneatrifleeager.
“For ten days or so. Will you come to see me?” Their eyes met and he felt
certainthattheinvitationwassincerelygiven.“LadyMarnhamishavingsome
peopleinto-morrowafternoon.Perhapsyou'llcomethen,”sheadded,andPhil
lookedcrestfallen.
“I'll come,” he said. “I want to tell you the story of my past life. You didn't
knowI'dbeenprimeministerofaSouthAmericanrepublic,didyou?”
She nodded and they separated. Prince Ugo heard the last words of the
American, and a small, clear line appeared for an instant between his black
eyebrows.


Lady Frances solemnly and secretively shook her finger at Quentin, and he
laughedwiththedisdainofonewhounderstandsanddenieswithouttheuseof
words. Lord Bob had wanted to kick him when he mentioned South America,
buthesaidnothing.Quentinwasinwonderfulspiritsallthewayhome.


VI.DOROTHYGARRISON
Quentin was driving with Lady Saxondale to the home of Miss Garrison's
hostess.Phil'sfair,calculatingcompanionsaidtoherselfthatshehadneverseen
ahandsomerfellowthanthisstalwartAmerican.Therewasabouthimthatclean,
strong,sweetlookoftheabsolutelyhealthyman,themanwhohasbuffetedthe
worldandnotbeenbuffetedbytheworld.Hewasfrank,bright,straightforward,
andtherewasthatalways-to-be-fearedyetever-to-be-desiredgleamofmastery
in his eye. It may have been sometimes a wicked mastery, and more than one
womanwhoadmiredhimbecauseshecouldnothelpherselfhadsaid,“Thereis
adevilinhiseyes.”
They found Lady Marnham's reception hall full of guests, few of whom
Quentinhadseenbefore.Hewasrelievedtofindthattheprincewasnotpresent,
andhemadehiswaytoDorothy'sside,withLadyFrances,coollydroppinginto
thechairwhichayoungcaptainhadmomentarilyabandoned.LadyFrancessat
besideMissGarrisononthedivan.
“Iamsogladyoukeptyourpromise,Phil,andcame.Itseemsgoodtoseeyou
after all these years. You bring back the dear days at home,” said Dorothy,
delightinhervoice.
“From that I judge you sometimes long for them,” he said, simply. To Lady
Francesitsoundeddaring.
“Often, oh, so very often. I have not been in New York for years. Lady
Saxondale goes back so often that she doesn't have the chance to grow
homesick.”
“Ihearyouaregoingoverthisfall,”saidQuentin,withafairshowofinterest.
“Who—who told you so?” she asked, in some surprise. He could not detect
confusion.
“PrinceRavorelli.Atleast,hesaidheexpectedtomakethetripthisfall.AmI
wronginsuspectingthatheisnotgoingalone?”
“WemeantospendmuchofthewinterintheUnitedStates,chieflyinFlorida.
Ishalldependonyou,Phil,tobenicetohiminNewYork.Youcandosomuch
tomakeitpleasantforhim.HehasneverbeeninNewYork,youknow.”
“Itmaydependonwhathewillconsiderpleasant.Idon'tbelievehewillenjoy
allthethingsIlike.ButI'lltry.I'llgetDickeySavagetogiveadinnerforhim,


and if he can survive that, he's capable of having a good time anywhere.
Dickey'sdinnersaretherealtest,youknow.Americansstandthembecausethey
areruggedandaccustomedtodanger.”
“You will find Prince Ugo rugged,” she said, flushing slightly, and he
imaginedhecoulddistinguishasoftnessinhertone.
“Iamtoldheisanathlete,agreathorseman,amarvelousswordsman,”said
LadyFrances.
“Iamgladyouhaveheardsomethingabouthimthatistrue,”saidDorothy,a
trifle quickly. “Usually they say that princes are all that is detestable and
unmanly.Iamsureyouwilllikehim,Phil.”
Mrs. Garrison came up at this moment with Lady Marnham, and Quentin
arose to greet the former as warmly as he could under the smooth veil of
hypocrisy.Again,justbeforeLadyFrancessignaledtohimthatitwastimefor
themtoleave,hefoundhimselfinconversation,overtheteacups,withDorothy
Garrison.Thistimetheywerequitealone.
“It doesn't seem possible that you are the same Dorothy Garrison I used to
know,”hesaid,reflectively.
“Have I changed so much?” she asked, and there was in her manner an icy
barrierthatwouldhavecheckedalessconfidentmanthanPhilipQuentin.
“Ineveryway.Youwerecharminginthosedays.”
“Andnotcharmingnow,Iinfer.”
“You are more than charming now. That is hardly a change, however, is it?
Then,youwereverypretty,nowyouarebeautiful.Then,youwere—”
“Idon'tlikeflattery,Phil,”shesaid,hurtbywhatshefelttobeanindifferent
effortonhisparttopleasehervanity.
“IamquitesureyouremembermewellenoughtoknowthatIneversaidnice
things unless I meant them. But, now that I think of it, it is the height of
improprietytospeaksoplainlyeventoanoldfriend,andanold—er—chum.”
“Won'tyouhaveacupoftea?”sheasked,ascalmlyasifhewerethemerest
strangerandhadneverseenhertillthishour.
“Adozen,ifitpleasesyou,”hesaid,laughingly,lookingstraightintothedark
eyesshewasstrivingsohardtokeepcoldandunfriendly.
“Thenyoumustcomeanotherday,”sheanswered,brightly.
“Icannotcometo-morrow,”hesaid.
“Ididnotsay'to-morrow.'”


“ButI'llcomeonFriday,”hewenton,decisively.Shelookedconcernedforan
instantandthensmiled.
“LadyMarnhamwillgiveyouteaonFriday.Ishallnotbeathome,”shesaid.
“ButIamgoingbacktoNewYorknextweek,”hesaid,confidently.
“Nextweek?Areyousobusy?”
“Iamnotanxioustoreturn,butmymanTurksayshehatesLondon.Hesays
he'llleavemeifIstayhereamonth.Ican'taffordtoloseTurk.”
“And he can't afford to lose you. Stay, Phil; the Saxondales are such jolly
people.”
“HowabouttheteaonFriday?”
“Oh,thatisnoconsideration.”
“Butitis,youknow.Youusedtogivemeteaeverydayintheweek.”Hesaw
atoncethathehadgonebeyondthelines,anddrewbackwisely.“Letmecome
onFriday,andwe'llhaveagood,sensiblechat.”
“Onthatonecondition,”shesaid,earnestly.
“Thank you. Good-bye. I see Lady Frances is ready to go. Evidently I have
monopolized you to a somewhat thoughtless extent. Everybody is looking
daggersatme,includingtheprince,whocameintenminutesago.”
Hearoseandheldherhandforamomentatparting.Herswift,abashedglance
toward Prince Ugo, whose presence she had not observed, did not escape his
eyes.ShelookedupandsawthepeculiarsmileonQuentin'slips,andtherewas
deepmeaninginhernextremarktohim:
“YouwillmeettheprincehereonFriday.Ishallaskhimtocomeearly,thathe
maylearntoknowyoubetter.”
“Thankyou.I'dliketoknowhimbetter.Atwhathourishetocome?”
“By3:30,atleast,”shesaid,pointedly.“Tooearlytobecorrect,yoususpect?”
“Ithinknot.Youmayexpectmebeforethree.Iamnotasticklerforform.”
“Weshallnotserveteauntilfouro'clock,”shesaid,coldly.
“That's my hour for tea—just my hour,” he said, blithely. She could not
repress the smile that his old willfulness brought to her lips and eyes. “Thank
you,forthesmile.Itwasworthstrugglingfor.”
He was gone before she could respond, but the smile lingered as her eyes
followedhistallfigureacrosstheroom.ShesawhimpauseandspeaktoPrince
Ugo,andthenpassoutwithLadySaxondale.OnlyLadySaxondaleobservedthe
dark gleam in the Italian's eyes as he responded to the big American's


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×