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Kate bonnet


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Title:KateBonnet
TheRomanceofaPirate'sDaughter
Author:FrankR.Stockton
ReleaseDate:November12,2005[eBook#17053]
Language:English
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Youshouldhaveseenthatwonderfulpiratefight.

"Oh,Kate!"saidDickory,"youshouldhaveseenthatwonderfulpirate


fight."(Seepage350.)


KATEBONNET


TheRomanceofaPirate'sDaughter
BY


FRANKR.STOCKTON
DecorativedrawingofKateBonnet

IllustratedbyA.J.Keller
and

H.S.Potter
NEWYORK
D.APPLETONANDCOMPANY
1902

COPYRIGHT,1901,1903

ByD.APPLETONANDCOMPANY
Allrightsreserved
February,1902


CONTENTS
CHAPTER
I. TWOYOUNGPEOPLE,ASHIP,ANDAFISH
II. AFRUIT-BASKETANDAFRIEND
III. THETWOCLOCKS


IV. ONTHEQUARTER-DECK
V. ANUNSUCCESSFULERRAND
VI. APAIROFSHOESANDSTOCKINGS
VII. KATEPLANS
VIII. BENGREENWAYISCONVINCEDTHATBONNETISAPIRATE
IX. DICKORYSETSFORTH
X. CAPTAINCHRISTOPHERVINCE
XI. BADWEATHER
XII. FACETOFACE
XIII. CAPTAINBONNETGOESTOCHURCH
XIV. AGIRLTOTHEFRONT
XV. THEGOVERNOROFJAMAICA
XVI. AQUESTIONOFETIQUETTE
XVII. ANORNAMENTEDBEARD
XVIII. IHAVENORIGHT;IAMAPIRATE
XIX. THENEWFIRSTLIEUTENANT
XX. ONENORTH,ONESOUTH
XXI. APROJECTEDMARRIAGE
XXII. BLADETOBLADE
XXIII. THEADDRESSOFTHELETTER
XXIV. BELIZE
XXV. WISEMR.DELAPLAINE
XXVI. DICKORYSTRETCHESHISLEGS
XXVII. AGIRLWHOLAUGHED
XXVIII. LUCILLA'SSHIP

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XXIX. CAPTAINICHABOD
XXX. DAMECHARTERMAKESAFRIEND
XXXI. MR.DELAPLAINELEADSABOARDINGPARTY
XXXII. THEDELIVERYOFTHELETTER
XXXIII. BLACKBEARDGIVESGREENWAYSOMEDIFFICULTWORK
XXXIV. CAPTAINTHOMASOFTHEROYALJAMES
XXXV. ACHAPTEROFHAPPENINGS
XXXVI. THETIDEDECIDES
XXXVII. BONNETANDGREENWAYPARTCOMPANY
XXXVIII. AGAINDICKORYWASTHERE
XXXIX. THEBLESSINGSWHICHCOMEFROMTHEDEATHOFTHEWICKED
XL. CAPTAINICHABODPUTSTHECASE
RECENTFICTION.

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LISTOFILLUSTRATIONS


FACING
PAGE

"Oh,Kate!"saidDickory,"youshouldhaveseenthatwonderful
Frontispiece
piratefight"
"IfyoutalktomelikethatIwillcutyoudownwhereyoustand!"
46
"Heismyfather!"saidKate
124
"Hasteye!hasteye,"criedDickory,"theywillleaveyoubehind"
155
"Takethat,"hefeeblysaid,"andswearthatitshallbedelivered"
241
Kateandherfatherinthewarehouse
260
LucillarescuesDickory
337
InaninstantDickorywasthere
403


KATEBONNET


CHAPTERI
TWOYOUNGPEOPLE,ASHIP,ANDAFISH
decorativedrop-capillustration
The month was September and the place was in the neighbourhood of
Bridgetown, in the island of Barbadoes. The seventeenth century was not
seventeenyearsold,butthegirlwhowalkedslowlydowntotheriverbankwas
threeyearsitssenior.Shecarriedafishing-rodandline,andhernamewasKate
Bonnet.Shewasabright-faced,quick-movingyoungperson,andapparentlydid
notexpecttocatchmanyfish,forshehadnobasketinwhichtocarryawayher
finnyprizes.Nor,apparently,didshehaveanybait,exceptthatwhichwasupon
herhookandwhichhadbeenaffixedtherebyoneoftheservantsatherhome,
notfaraway.Infact,MistressKatewastoonicelydressedandhergloveswere
toocleantohavemuchtodowithfishorbait,butsheseatedherselfonalittle
rock in a shady spot not far from the water and threw forth her line. Then she
gazedabouther;alittleuptheriverandagooddealdowntheriver.
Itwastrulyapleasantscenewhichlaybeforehereyes.Nothalfamileawaywas
the bridge which gave this English settlement its name, and beyond the river
werewoodsandcultivatedfields,withhereandtherealittlebitofsmoke,forit
was growing late in the afternoon, when smoke meant supper. Beyond all this
theland rose fromthelower groundneartheriverandthesea,interraceafter
terrace, until the upper stretches of its woodlands showed clear against the
eveningsky.
ButMistressKateBonnetnowgazedsteadilydownthestream,beyondthetown
andthebridge,andpaidnomoreattentiontothescenerythanthescenerydidto
her,althoughonewasquiteasbeautifulastheother.
Therewasabunchofwhiteflowersinthehatoftheyounggirl;notaverylarge
one,andnotaverysmallone,butofsuchasizeasmightbeeasilyseenfromthe
bridge,hadanyonehappenedtobecrossingaboutthattime.And,infact,asthe
wearerofthehatandthewhiteflowersstillcontinuedtogazeatthebridge,she
sawsomeonecomeoutuponitwithaquick,buoyantstep,andthenshesawhim
stop and gaze steadily up the river. At this she turned her head, and her eyes


went out over the beautiful landscape and the wide terraces rising above each
othertowardsthesky.
Itisastonishinghowsoonafterthisayoungman,dressedinabrownsuit,and
verypleasanttolookupon,camerapidlywalkingalongtheriverbank.Thiswas
MasterMartinNewcombe,ayoungEnglishman,nottwoyearsfromhisnative
land,andnowaprosperousfarmerontheothersideoftheriver.
ItoftenhappenedthatMasterNewcombe,atthecloseofhisagriculturallabours,
would put on a good suit of clothes and ride over the bridge to the town, to
attendtobusinessortosocialduties,asthecasemightbe.But,sometimes,not
willingtoencumberhimselfwithahorse,hewalkedoverthebridgeandstrolled
orhurriedalongtheriverbank.Thiswasoneofthetimesinwhichhehurried.
Hehadbeencaughtbythevisionofthebunchofwhiteflowersinthehatofthe
girlwhowasseatedontherockintheshade.
AsMasterNewcombesteppednear,hisspiritsrose,astheyhadnotalwaysrisen,
as he approached Mistress Kate, for he perceived that, although she held the
handleofherrodinherhand,theotherendofitwaslyingontheground,not
veryfarawayfromthebaitandthehookwhich,itwasveryplain,hadnotbeen
in the water at all. She must have been thinking of something else besides
fishing,hethought.Buthedidnotdaretogoonwiththatsortofthinkinginthe
way he would have liked to do it. He had not too great a belief in himself,
thoughhewasverymuchinlovewithKateBonnet.
"Isthisthebesttimeofdayforfishing,MasterNewcombe?"shesaid,without
risingorofferinghimherhand."Formypart,Idon'tbelieveitis."
He smiled as he threw his hat upon the ground. "Let me put your line a little
fartherout."Andsosaying,hetooktherodfromherhandandsteppedbetween
herandthebait,whichmusthavebeennowquitehotfromlyingsolonginabit
ofsunshine.Herearrangedthebaitandthrewthelinefaroutintotheriver.Then
hegavehertherodagain.Heseatedhimselfonthegroundnear-by.
"ThisisthesecondtimeIhavebeenoverthebridgeto-day,"hesaid,"andthis
morning,veryearly,Isaw,forthefirsttime,yourfather'sship,whichwaslying
belowthetown.Itisafinevessel,sofarasIcanjudge,beingalandsman."
"Yes,"saidshe,"andIhavebeenonboardofherandhavegonealloverher,and
have seen many things which are queer and strange to me. But the strangest
thingabouther,tomymind,beingalandswoman,is,thatsheshouldbelongto


myfather.Therearemanythingswhichhehasnot,whichitwouldbeeasyto
believe he would like to have, but that a ship, with sails and anchors and
hatchways,shouldbeoneofthesethings,itishardtoimagine."
Young Newcombe thought it was impossible to imagine, but he expressed
himselfdiscreetly.
"Itmustbethatheisgoingtoengageintrade,"hesaid;"hashenottoldyouof
hisintentions?"
"Not much," said she. "He says he is going to cruise about among the islands,
and when I asked him if he would take me, he laughed, and answered that he
mightdoso,butthatImustneversayawordofittoMadamBonnet,forifshe
heardofitshemightchangehisplans."
The wicked young man found himself almost wishing that the somewhat badtemperedMadamBonnetmighthearofandchangeanyplanwhichmighttake
her husband's daughter from this town, especially in a vessel; for vessels were
alwaysterriblytardywhenanyonewaswaitingfortheirreturn.And,besides,it
oftenhappenedthatvesselsnevercamebackatall.
"Ishalltakealittletripwithhimevenifwedon'tgofar;itwouldberidiculous
formyfathertoownaship,andformenevertosailinher."
"That would not be so bad," said Master Martin, feeling that a short absence
might be endured. Moreover, if a little pleasure trip were to be made, it was
reasonable enough to suppose that other people, not belonging to the Bonnet
family,mightbeaskedtosailasguests.
"Whatmyfatherexpectstotradein,"saidshecontemplativelygazingbeforeher,
"IamsureIdonotknow.Itcannotbehorsesorcattle,forhehasnotenoughof
themtomakesuchaventureprofitable.Andastosugar-cane,oranythingfrom
his farm, I am sure he has a good enough market here for all he has to sell.
Certainlyhedoesnotproduceenoughtomakeitnecessaryforhimtobuyaship
inordertocarrythemaway."
"Itisopined,"saidMartin,"bythepeopleofthetown,thatMajorBonnetintends
to become a commercial man, and to carry away to the other islands, and
perhapstotheoldcountryitself,thegoodsofotherpeople."
"Nowthatwouldbefine!"saidMistressKate,hereyessparkling,"forIshould
then surely go with him, and would see the world, and perhaps London." And


herfaceflushedwiththeprospect.
Martin'sfacedidnotflush."Butifyourfather'sshipsailedonalongvoyage,"he
said, with a suspicion of apprehension, "he would not sail with her; he would
sendherunderthechargeofothers."
Thegirlshookherhead."Whenshesails,"saidshe,"hesailsinher.Ifyouhad
heardhimtalkingasIhaveheardhim,youwouldnotdoubtthat.Andifhesails,
Isail."
Martin'ssoulgrewquitesad.Therewereverygoodreasonstobelievethatthis
deargirlmightsailawayfromBridgetown,andfromhim.Shemightcomeback
tothetown,butshemightnotcomebacktohim.
"MistressKate,"saidhe,lookingveryearnestlyather,"doyouknowthatsuch
speech as this makes my heart sink? You know I love you, I have told you so
before.Ifyouweretosailaway,Icarenottowhatport,thisworldwouldbea
blackplaceforme."
"Thatislikealover,"sheexclaimedalittlepertly;"itislikethemall,everyman
ofthem.Theymusthavewhattheywant,andtheymusthaveit,nomatterwho
elsemaysuffer."
Heroseandstoodbyher.
"ButIdon'twantyoutosuffer,"hesaid."Doyouthinkitwouldbesufferingto
live with one who loved you, who would spend his whole life in making you
happy, who would look upon you as the chief thing in the world, and have no
otherambitionthantomakehimselfworthyofyou?"
Shelookedupathimwithalittlesmile.
"Thatwould,doubtless,beallverypleasantforyou,"shesaid,"andinorderthat
youmightbepleased,youwouldhavehergiveupsomuch.Thatisthewaywith
men!Now,hereamI,bornintheveryendofthelastcentury,andhavinghad,
consequently,nogoodoutofthat,andwithbutseventeenyearsinthiscentury,
andmostofitpassedingirlhoodandinschool;andnow,whentheworldmight
openbeforemeforalittle,hereyoucomealongandtellmeallthatyouwould
liketohave,andthatyouwouldlikemetogiveup."
"Butyoushouldnotthink,"saidhe,andthatwasallhesaid,foratthatmoment
KateBonnetfeltalittlejerkattheendofherline,andthenagoodstrongpull.


"Ihaveafish!"shecried,andsprangtoherfeet.Then,withaswoop,shethrew
into the midst of the weeds and wild flowers a struggling fish which Martin
hastenedtotakefromthehook.
"Afinefellow!"hecried,"andhehasarrivedjustintimetomakeadaintydish
foryoursupper."
"Ah,no!"shesaid,windingthelineaboutherrod;"ifIweretotakethatfishto
the house, it would sorely disturb Madam Bonnet. She would object to my
catchingit;shewouldobjecttohavingitpreparedforthetable;shewouldobject
tohavingiteaten,whenshehadarrangedthatweshouldeatsomethingelse.No,
Iwillgiveittoyou,MasterNewcombe;Isupposeinyourhouseyoucancook
andeatwhatyouplease."
"Yes,"saidhe;"buthowdelightfulitwouldbeifwecouldeatittogether."
"Meaning,"saidshe,"thatIshouldnevereatotherfishthanthosefromthisriver.
No,sir;thatmaynotbe.IhaveanotionthatthefirstforeignfishIshalleatwill
befoundintheislandofJamaica,formyfathersaid,thatpossiblyhemightfirst
takeatripthere,wherelivesmymother'sbrother,whomwehavenotseenfora
longtime.But,asItoldyoubefore,nobodymustknowthis.AndnowImustgo
tomysupper,andyoumusttakeyourshomewithyou."
"AndIamsureitwillbethesweetestfish,"hesaid,"thatwasevercaughtinall
thesewaters.ButIbeg,beforeyougo,youwillpromisemeonething."
"Promiseyou!"saidshe,quiteloftily.
"Yes," he answered; "tell me that, no matter where you go, you will not leave
Bridgetownwithoutlettingmeknowofit?"
"Iwillnot,indeed,"saidshe;"andifitistoJamaicawego,perhapsmyfather—
but no, I don't believe he will do that. He will be too much wrapped up in his
shiptowantforcompanytowhomhemustattendandtalk."
"Ah!therewouldbenoneedofthat!"saidNewcombe,withalover'ssmile.
Shesmiledbackathim.
"Good-night!"shesaid,"andseetoitthatyoueatyourfishto-nightwhileitisso
fresh."Thensheranupthewindingpathtoherhome.
He stood and looked after her until she had disappeared among the shrubbery,


afterwhichhewalkedaway.
"IshouldhavesaidmorethanIdid,"hereflected;"seldomhaveIhadsogooda
chancetospeakandurgemycase.Itwasthatconfoundedship.Hermindisall
forthatandnotforme."


CHAPTERII
AFRUIT-BASKETANDAFRIEND
decorativedrop-capillustration
MajorStedeBonnet,thefatherofKate,whosemotherhaddiedwhenthechild
wasbutayearold,wasamiddle-agedEnglishmanofafairestate,intheisland
of Barbadoes. He had been an officer in the army, was well educated and
intelligent, and now, in vigorous middle life, had become a confirmed country
gentleman.Hisherdsandhiscropswere,tohim,theprincipalthingsonearth,
withtheexceptionofhisdaughter;for,althoughhehadmarriedforthesecond
time,therewereagoodmanythingswhichhevaluedmorethanhiswife.Andit
had therefore occasioned a good deal of surprise, and more or less small talk
amonghisneighbours,thatMajorBonnetshouldwanttobuyaship.Buthehad
beenasoldierinhisyouth,andsoldiersareveryapttochangetheirmannerof
living,andso,ifMajorBonnethadgrowntiredofhisfarmandhaddetermined
togointocommercialenterprises,itwasnot,perhaps,averyamazingthingthat
amilitarymanwhohadturnedplantershouldnowturntobesomethingelse.
MadamBonnethadheardoftheship,althoughshehadnotbeentoldanything
aboutherstep-daughtertakingatripinher,andifshehadheardshemightnot
haveobjected.Shehadregarded,inanapparentlycarelessmanner,herhusband's
desiretonavigatethesea;for,nomattertowhatpointhemighthappentosail,
hisshipwouldtakehimawayfromBarbadoes,andthatwouldverywellsuither.
ShewasgettingtiredofMajorBonnet.Shedidnotbelievehehadeverbeena
verygoodsoldier;shewaspositivelysurethathewasnotagoodfarmer;andshe
hadthestrongestkindofdoubtastohisabilityasacommercialman.Butasthis
newbusinesswouldfreeherfromhim,atleastforatime,shewaswellcontent;
and,althoughsheshouldfeelherselfsomewhathandicappedbythepresenceof
Kate,shedidnotintendtoallowthatyoungladytointerferewithherplansand
purposes during the absence of the head of the house. So she went her way,
saying nothing derisive about the nautical life, except what she considered it
necessary for her to do, in order to maintain her superior position in the
household.
Major Bonnet was now very much engaged and a good deal disturbed, for he


found that projected sailing, even in one's own craft, is not always smooth
sailing. He was putting his vessel in excellent order, and was fitting her out
generously in the way of stores and all manner of nautical needfuls, not
forgetting the guns necessary for defence in these somewhat disordered times,
andhislatestendeavoursweretowardstheshippingofasuitablecrew.Seafaring
menwerenotscarceintheportofBridgetown,butMajorBonnet,nowentitled
tobecalled"Captain,"wasveryparticularabouthiscrew,andittookhimalong
timetocollectsuitablemen.
Ashewasmosttrulyalandsman,knowingnothingabouttheseaorthevarious
intricatemethodsofnavigatingavesselthereupon,hewascompelledtosecurea
realcaptain—onewhowouldbeabletotakechargeofthevesselandcrew,and
who would do, and have done, in a thoroughly seamanlike manner, what his
nominalskippershoulddesireandordain.
This absolutely necessary personage had been secured almost as soon as the
vesselhadbeenpurchased,beforeanyoftherestofthecrewhadsignedship's
articles;anditwasunderhisgeneralsupervisionthatthestoringandequipment
hadbeencarriedon.HisnamewasSamLoftus.Hewasabigmanwithagreat
readinessofspeech.Therewere,perhaps,somethingshecouldnotdo,butthere
seemed tobenothing thathewasnotabletotalkabout.Ashas been said,the
restofthecrewcameinslowly,buttheydidcome,andMajorBonnettoldhis
daughterthatwhenhehadsecuredfourmoremen,itwashisintentiontoleave
port.
"AndsailforJamaica?"sheexclaimed.
"Oh, yes," he said, with an affectionate smile, "and I will leave you with your
UncleDelaplaine,whereyoucanstaywhileImakesomelittlecruiseshereand
there."
"AndsoIamreallytogo?"sheexclaimed,hereyessparkling.
"Reallytogo,"saidhe.
"AndwhatmayIpackup?"sheasked,thinkingofherstep-mother.
"Not much," he said, "not much. We will be able to find at Spanish Town
somethingbraverinthewayofapparelthananythingyounowpossess.Itwillbe
some days before we sail, and I shall have quietly conveyed on board such
belongingsasyouneed."


Shewasveryhappy,andshelaughed.
"Yourswillbeaneasilyladenship,"saidshe,"foryoutakeinwithyounogreat
storeofgoodsfortraffic.ButIsupposeyoudesigntopickupyourcargoamong
the islands where you cruise, and at a less cost, perchance, than it could be
procuredhere?"
"Yes,yes,"hesaid;"youhavehititfairly,mylittlegirl,youhavehititfairly."
New annoyances now began to beset Major Bonnet. What his daughter had
remarkedinpleasantry,thepeopleofthetownbegantotalkaboutunpleasantly.
Herewasagood-sizedcraftabouttosetsail,withlittleornocargo,butwitha
crewapparentlymuchlargerthanherrequirements,butnotyetlargeenoughfor
the desires of her owner. To be sure, as Major Bonnet did not know anything
about ships, he was bound to do something odd when he bought one and set
forthtosailuponher,butthereweresomeoddthingswhichoughttobelooked
into; and there were people who advised that the attention of the colonial
authoritiesshouldbedrawntothisshipoftheirfarmertownsman.MajorBonnet
had such a high reputation as a good citizen, that there were few people who
thoughtitworthwhiletotroublethemselvesabouthisnewbusinessventure,but
agoodmanydisagreeablethingscametotheearsofSamLoftus,whoreported
themtohisemployer,anditwasagreedbetweenthemthatitwouldbewisefor
themtosailassoonastheycould,eveniftheydidnotwaitforthefewmenthey
hadconsideredtobeneeded.
Early upon a cloudy afternoon, Major Bonnet and his daughter went out in a
smallboattolookathisvessel,theSarahWilliams,whichwasthenlyingashort
distancebelowthetown.
"Now, Kate," said the good Major Bonnet, when they were on board, "I have
fitted up a little room for you below, which I think you will find comfortable
enoughduringthevoyagetoJamaica.IwilltakeyouwithmewhenIreturnto
thehouse,andthenyoucanmakeupalittlepackageofclotheswhichitwillbe
easytoconveytotheriverbankwhenthetimeshallcomeforyoutodepart.I
cannot now say just when that time will arrive; it may be in the daytime or it
maybeatnight,butitwillbesoon,andIwillgiveyougoodnotice,andIwill
comeuptheriverforyouinaboat.ButnowIamverybusy,andIwillleaveyou
to become acquainted with the Sarah Williams, which, for a few days, will be
yourhome.Ishallbeobligedtorowovertothetownfor,perhaps,halfanhour,
butBenGreenwaywillbeheretoattendtoanythingyouneeduntilIreturn."


BenGreenwaywasaScotchman,whohadforalongtimebeenMajorBonnet's
mosttrustedservant.Hewasagoodfarmer,wasaptatcarpenterwork,andknew
a good deal about masonry. A few months ago, any one living in that region
wouldhavebeenlikelytosay,ifthesubjecthadbeenbroughtup,thatwithout
BenGreenwayMajorBonnetcouldnotgetalongatall,notevenforaday,forhe
dependeduponhiminsomanyways.Andyet,nowthemasteroftheestatewas
about to depart, for nobody knew how long, and leave his faithful servant
behind.Thereasonhegavewas,thatBencouldnotbesparedfromthefarm;but
peopleingeneral,andBeninparticular,thoughtthisverypoorreasoning.Any
sortofbusinesswhichmadeitnecessary forMajorBonnettoseparatehimself
fromBenGreenwaywasaverypoorbusiness,andshouldnotbeenteredupon.
ThedeckoftheSarahWilliamspresentedalivelysceneasKatestooduponthe
littlequarter-deckandgazedforward.Thesailorswerewalkingaboutandsitting
about, smoking, talking, or coiling things away. There were people from the
shorewithbasketscontainingfruitandotherwaresforsale,andallstirringand
newandveryinterestingtoMissKateasshestood,withherribbonsflyinginthe
riverbreeze.
"Who is that young fellow?" she said to Ben Greenway, who was standing by
her,"theonewiththebigbasket?ItseemstomeIhaveseenhimbefore."
"Oh, ay!" said Ben, "he has been on the farm. That is Dickory Charter, whose
fatherwasdrownedoutfishingafewyearsago.Heisagoodlad,an'boardsall
shipscomin'inorgoin'outtosellhiswares,forhismitherleansonhimnow,
havingnoither."
Theyouth,whoseemedtofeelthathewasbeingtalkedabout,nowwalkedaft,
and held up his basket. He was a handsome youngster, lightly clad and
barefooted;and,althoughnotyetfullgrown,ofastrongandactivebuild.Kate
beckonedtohim,andboughtanorange.
"An'howisyourmither,Dickory?"saidBen.
"Rightwell,Ithankyou,"saidhe,andgazedatKate,whowasbitingaholein
herorange.
Then,asheturnedandwentaway,havingnoreasontoexpecttosellanything
more, Kate remarked to Ben: "That is truly a fine-looking young fellow. He
walkswithsuchstrengthandease,likeadeeroracat."


"That comes from no' wearin' shoes," said Ben; "but as for me, I would like
bettertowearshoesan'walkmairstiffly."
Nowtherecameaftasailor,whotouchedhiscapandtoldBenGreenwaythathe
waswantedbelowtosuperintendthestowingsomecasesofthecaptain'sliquors.
SoKate,lefttoherself,begantothinkaboutwhatsheshouldpackintoherlittle
bundle.Shewouldmakeitverysmall,forthefewerthingsshetookwithherthe
moreshewouldbuyatSpanishTown.Butthecontentsofherpackagedidnot
requiremuchthought,andshesoonbecamealittletiredstayingtherebyherself,
and therefore she was glad to see young Dickory, with his orange-basket,
walkingaft.
"I don't want any more oranges," she said, when he was near enough, "but
perhapsyoumayhaveotherfruit?"
Hecameuptoherandput downhisbasket. "Ihavebananas, butperhapsyou
don'tlikethem?"
"Oh,yes,Ido!"sheanswered.
But, without offering to show her the fruit, Dickory continued: "There's one
thingIdon'tlike,andthat'sthemenonboardyourship."
"Whatdoyoumean?"sheasked,amazed.
"Speaklower,"hesaid;and,ashespoke,hebethoughthimselfthatitmightbe
welltoholdouttowardsheracoupleofbananas.
"They're a bad, hard lot of men," he said. "I heard that from more than one
person.Yououghtnottostayonthisship."
"And what do you know about it, Mr. Impudence?" she asked, with brows
uplifted."Isupposemyfatherknowswhatisgoodforme."
"Butheisnothere,"saidDickory.
Katelookedsteadfastlyathim.Hedidnotseemasruddyashehadbeen.And
then she looked out upon the forward deck, and the thought came to her that
whenshehadfirstnoticedthesemenithadseemedtoherthattheywere,indeed,
arough,hardlot.KateBonnetwasabravegirl,butwithoutknowingwhyshe
feltalittlefrightened.
"YournameisDickory,isn'tit?"shesaid.


Helookedupquickly,foritpleasedhimtohearherusehisname."Indeeditis,"
heanswered.
"Well, Dickory," said she, "I wish you would go and find Ben Greenway. I
shouldliketohavehimwithmeuntilmyfathercomesback."
Heturned,andthenstoppedforaninstant.Hesaidinaclearvoice:"Iwillgo
andgettheshillingchanged."Andthenhehurriedaway.
He was gone a long time, and Kate could not understand it. Surely the Sarah
Williams was not so big a ship that it would take all this time to look for Ben
Greenway. But he did come back, and his face seemed even less ruddy than
whenshehadlastseenit.Hecameupclosetoher,andbeganhandlinghisfruit.
"Idon'twanttofrightenyou,"hesaid,"butImusttellyouaboutthings.Icould
notfindBenGreenway,andIaskedoneofthemenabouthim,feigningthathe
owed me for some fruit, and the man looked at another man and laughed, and
saidthathehadbeensentforinahurry,andhadgoneashoreinaboat."
"Icannotbelievethat,"saidKate;"hewouldnotgoawayandleaveme."
Dickorycouldnotbelieveiteither,andcouldoffernoexplanation.
Katenowlookedanxiouslyoverthewatertowardsthetown,butnofatherwas
tobeseen.
"NowletmetellyouwhatIfoundout,"saidDickory,"youmustknowit.These
men are wicked robbers. I slipped quietly among them to find out something,
withmyshillinginmyhand,readytoasksomebodytochange,ifIwasnoticed."
"Well,whatnext?"layingherhandonhisarm.
"Oh,don'tdothat!"hesaidquickly;"bettertakeholdofabanana.Ispiedthat
Big Sam, who is sailing-master, and a black-headed fellow taking their ease
behindsomeboxes,smoking,andIlistenedwithallsharpness.AndSam,hesaid
totheotherone—notinthesewords,butinlanguagenotfitforyoutohear—
what he would like to do would be to get off on the next tide. And when the
otherfellowaskedhimwhyhedidn'tgothenandleavethefool—meaningyour
father—to go back to his farm, Big Sam answered, with a good many curses,
thatifhecoulddoithewoulddropdowntheriverthatveryminuteandwaitat
the bar until the water was high enough to cross, but that it was impossible
becausetheymustnotsailuntilyourfatherhadbroughthiscash-boxonboard.It


wouldbestupidtosailwithoutthatcash-box."
"Dickory,"saidshe,"Iamfrightened;Iwanttogoonshore,andIwanttosee
myfatherandtellhimallthesethings."
"Butthereisnoboat,"saidDickory;"everyboathaslefttheship."
"Butyouhaveone,"saidshe,lookingovertheside.
"Itisapoorlittlecanoe,"heanswered,"andIamafraidtheywouldnotletme
takeyouaway,Ihavingnoorderstodoso."
Kate was about to open her mouth to make an indignant reply, when he
exclaimed,"Butherecomesaboatfromthetown;perhapsitisyourfather!"
Shesprangtotherail."No,itisnot,"sheexclaimed;"itholdsbutoneman,who
rows."
She stood, without a word, watching the approaching boat, Dickory doing the
same,butkeepinghimselfoutofthegeneralview.Theboatcamealongsideand
theoarsmanhandedupanote,whichwaspresentlybroughttoKatebyBigSam,
youngDickoryCharterhavinginthemeantimeslippedbelowwithhisbasket.
"Anotefromyourfather,MistressBonnet,"saidthesailing-master.Andasshe
readithestoodandlookeduponher.
"My father tells me," said Kate, speaking decidedly but quietly, "that he will
comeonboardverysoon,butIdonotwishtowaitforhim.Iwillgobacktothe
town.Ihaveaffairswhichmakeitnecessaryformetoreturnimmediately.Tell
themanwhobroughtthenotethatIwillgobackwithhim."
BigSamraisedhiseyebrowsandhisfaceassumedalookoftrouble.
"Itgrievesmegreatly,MistressBonnet,"hesaid,"butthemanhasgone.Hewas
orderednottowaithere."
"Shoutafterhim!"criedKate;"callhimback!"
Samsteppedtotherailandlookedoverthewater."Heistoofaraway,"hesaid,
"butIwilltry."Andthenheshouted,butthemanpaidnoattention,andkepton
rowingtoshore.
"Ithoughtitwastoofar,"hesaid,"butyourfatherwillbebacksoon;hesentthat
messagetome.Andnow,fairmistress,whatcanwedoforyou?Shallitbethat


wesendyousomesupper?Or,asyourcabinisready,wouldyouprefertostep
downtoitandwaitthereforyourfather?"
"No,"saidshe,"Iwillwaithereformyfather.Iwantnothing."
So,withabowhestrodeaway,andpresentlyDickorycameback.Shedrewnear
tohimandwhispered."Dickory,"shesaid,"whatshallIdo?ShallIscreamand
wavemyhandkerchief?Perhapstheymayseeandhearmefromthetown."
"No,"saidDickory,"Iwouldnotdothat.Thenightiscomingon,andtheskyis
cloudy.Andbesides,ifyoumakeanoise,thosefellowsmightdosomething."
"Oh,Dickory,whatshallIdo?"
"Youmustwaitforyourfather,"hesaid;"hemustbeheresoon,andthemoment
you see him, call to him and make him take you to shore. You should both of
yougetawayfromthisvesselassoonasyoucan."
Foramomentthegirlreflected."Dickory,"saidshe,"Iwishyouwouldtakea
messageformetoMasterMartinNewcombe.Hemaybeabletogetheretome
evenbeforemyfatherarrives."
DickoryCharterknewMr.Newcombe,andhehadheardwhatmanypeoplehad
talked about, that he was courting Major Bonnet's daughter. The day before
Dickory would not have cared who the young planter was courting, but this
evening, even to his own surprise, he cared very much. He was intensely
interested in Kate, and he did not desire to help Martin Newcombe to take an
interestinher.Besides,hespokehonestlyashesaid:"Andwhowouldtherebe
totakecareofyou?No,indeed,Iwillnotleaveyou."
"Thenrowtothetown,"saidshe,"andhaveaboatsentforme."
Heshookhishead."No,"hesaid,"Iwillnotleaveyou."
Hereyesflashed."Youshoulddowhatyouarecommandedtodo!"andinher
excitementshealmostforgottowhisper.
Heshookhisheadandlefther.


CHAPTERIII
THETWOCLOCKS


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