Tải bản đầy đủ

Lecture Evidence based medicine: Effectiveness of therapy

EVIDENCE BASED 
MEDICINE

Effectiveness of therapy

Ross Lawrenson


Critically appraising a therapy 
paper


Critical Appraisal of a therapy 
paper ­ methodology
• When critically appraising a paper 
ask yourself three questions:
– Are the results valid?
– What are the results?
– Will the results help me in caring for 
my patients?


• Go to the therapy worksheet for the 
complete list of questions


I. Are the results valid?
• In other words was this a well designed 
study in a relevant population. The best 
study design to answer a therapy question 
is a randomised controlled trial. 
• Go through the worksheet questions 1­ 6 to 
help you decide whether you are likely to 
believe the results of the paper you are 
considering.


1. Did the study address a clearly 
focused question?
• Can you define

– The population they studied
– The intervention
– The comparison group
– The outcomes


2. Was the assignment of patients 
randomised?


Efficacy versus effectiveness


Efficacy versus effectiveness
• Efficacy ­ does receiving treatment 
work under ideal conditions?


Efficacy versus effectiveness
• Efficacy ­ does receiving treatment 
work under ideal conditions?


• Effectiveness ­ does offering treatment 
help under ordinary circumstances?


Observation versus 
experimental studies.


Observation versus experimental 
studies
• A study population of 2000 patients 
with acute coronary heart disease of 
whom half receive a certain 
intervention and the other half do 
not. Of the 2000 patients, 700 have 
arrhythmia "X" and 1300 do not.


Observation versus experimental 
studies
• A study population of 2000 patients with 
acute coronaries of whom half receive a 
certain intervention and the other half do 
not. Of the 2000 patients, 700 have 
arrhythmia "X" and 1300 do not.
• X(+) = Patients with arrhythmia "X"  
have a mortality of 50%
• X(­) = Patients without arrhythmia  have 
a mortality of 10%.


Observational study

Intervention

No intervention

X(­)
800

X(­)
500

X(+)
200

Deaths 180

Relative risk = 0.6 

X(+)
500

300


Randomised controlled trial

Intervention

No intervention

X(­)
650

X(­)
650

X(+)
350

Deaths 240

Relative risk = 1

X(+)
350

240


Absolute risk
•  Incidence rate of the outcome in the 

population (can be the treated or the 
untreated population).


Relative risk
• Relative risk  (RR) is the absolute risk 
in the treated group divided by the 
absolute risk in the untreated group (or 
vice versa)


Randomised controlled trials
• Because the randomised trial removes selection 
bias the result of the study should be believed 
over the evidence from the observational study 
i.e. the Relative risk is 1 (no difference in 
treatment) not 0.6 (which suggested a benefit 
from treatment.)
•  An example of this would be the use of HRT 
and the reduction in cardiovascular risk. 
Observational studies have shown a 50% 
reduction in CHD but the RCT showed no 
benefit. (References)


3. Were all patients who entered 
the trial properly accounted for 
and attributed at its conclusion?
(a) Was the follow up complete? ­ 
selection bias
(b) Were the patients analysed in the 
groups to which they were 
randomised? ­ intention to treat 
analysis.


         Selection bias
Randomised controlled trials
Sample
Population

Treatment 1

Outcomes

Treatment 2 

Outcomes


(a) Selection of study population


sample


(Should be representative
of the general population 
to ensure external validity)

sample

trial 
population

unsuitable 
(excluded)


sample

trial
population

unsuitable
(excluded)

intervention trial
completed

adverse
events/lost to
follow up


= Possible bias

sample

trial
population

unsuitable
(excluded)

intervention trial
completed

adverse events/lost
to follow up


Sources of selection bias
Non random sample is selected. 
e.g. Volunteers. Healthy worker. 
Hospital patients.


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×