Tải bản đầy đủ

Lecture Medical assisting: Administrative and clinical competencies (2/e) - Chapter 47

PowerPoint® to accompany

Medical Assisting
Chapter 47

Second Edition

Ramutkowski  Booth  Pugh  Thompson  Whicker

Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.

1


Collecting, Processing and 
Testing Urine Specimens
Objectives
47­1 Describe the characteristics of urine, including 
its formation, physical composition, and 
chemical properties.
47­2 Explain how to instruct patients in specimen 

collection.
47­3 Identify guidelines to follow when collecting 
urine specimens.
47­5 Explain the process of urinary catheterization.
2


Collecting, Processing and 
Testing Urine Specimens
Objectives (cont.)
47­6 List special considerations that may require you 
to alter guidelines when collecting urine 
specimens.
47­7 Explain how to preserve and store urine 
specimens.
47­8 Explain how to maintain the chain of custody 
when processing urine specimens.
47­8 Explain how to preserve and store urine 
specimens.
3


Collecting, Processing and 
Testing Urine Specimens
Objectives (cont.)
47­9 Describe the process of urinalysis and its 
purpose.
47­10 Identify the physical characteristics present in 
normal urine specimens.
47­11 Identify the chemicals that may be found in 
urine specimens.
47­12 Identify the elements categorized and counted 
as a result of microscopic examination of 
urine specimens.
4


Introduction 
Routine urine analysis
 Simple, non­invasive 


diagnostic test 
provides a window 
to the patient’s 
health.

You will learn how to 
correctly process a 
specimen, including 
a random specimen 
and chain of custody 
drug screen.

 You will learn about various types of urine specimens and 
how to properly instruct or assist patients with collection 
of these specimens.
5


Role of the Medical Assistant
Help collect, process, and 
test urine specimens.
You will need to know:
 Anatomy and 
physiology of kidney
 How urine is formed
 Normal urine contents

6


The Urinary System 
Organs of the urinary system:





Kidneys 
Ureters 
Urinary bladder 
Urethra 

Click for larger view

Kidney function ­ removes waste products from the 
blood stream and excess water 
 Urinary bladder stores urine, and ureters, bladder 
and urethra make up the urinary tract 7


The Urinary System
Urethra

Aorta

Kidneys

Liver

Urinary bladder

Left Ureter

Right Ureter

Prostate gland

8
Using the On­Screen Pen draw a line to each of the organs.


Formation of Urine  
Three processes of   The nephron:
urine formation:    allows for 
 
 glomerular 
filtration  
 tubular 
reabsorption  
 tubular secretion 

reabsorption of 
water and 
electrolytes 
 plays a vital role in 
maintaining normal 
fluid balance
9


Physical Composition and 
Chemical Properties 
Urine 
 95% water
 5% waste products
 Other dissolved chemicals
Urea, uric acid, ammonia, calcium, 
creatine, sodium, chloride, potassium, 
sulfates, phosphates, bicarbonates, 
hydrogen ions, urochrome, urobilinogen
10


Apply Your Knowledge
Components of normal urine include:
A ­ urea, uric acid and ammonia.
B ­ chloride, potassium and sugar.
C ­ red blood cells, sperm and H2O2
D ­ hydrogen ions, urochrome, and uranium.
11


Apply Your Knowledge ­Answer
Components of normal urine include:
A ­ urea, uric acid and ammonia.
B ­ chloride, potassium and sugar.
C ­ red blood cells, sperm and H2O2
D ­ hydrogen ions, urochrome, and uranium.
12


Obtaining Specimens 
General guidelines:
 Follow the procedure
 Use the type of specimen container indicated by the 
lab
 Label the specimen container before giving it to 
patient
 Explain the procedure to patient 
 Wash your hands before and after procedure
 Complete all necessary paperwork
13


Specimens Types 
Varies in method used and in time 
frame in which to collect 
specimen
Types of specimens:
 Random
 First morning
 Clean catch midstream
 Timed
 24 hour
14


Specimens Types (cont.)
 Random – most common, taken anytime of day
 First morning – has a greater concentration of 
substances, taken in morning
 Clean catch midstream – genitalia is cleaned, urine is 
tested for microorganisms or presence of infection
 Timed – specific time of day, always discard first 
specimen before timing
 24 hour – used for quantitative and qualitative 
analysis of substances
15


Catheterization
 Urinary catheter – 
Urinary catheter
plastic tube 
inserted to provide 
urinary drainage
 Catheterization – 
Catheterization 
procedure during 
which the catheter 
is inserted
16


Catheterization (cont.)
 Catheterization is used to:
 Relieve urinary retention
 Obtain a sterile urine specimen
 Measure the amount of residual urine in the 
bladder
 Obtain urine specimen if patient cannot void
 Instill chemotherapy
 Empty bladder before and during surgery and 
before some diagnostic examinations
17


Catheterization (cont.)
 Drainage catheters





Indwelling urethral (Foley)
Retention catheter in the renal pelvis
Ureteral catheter
Drainage through a wound that leads to a 
bladder 

 Splinting catheter

 Placed to repair ureter and must remain in 
place for a week

18


Catheterization (cont.)
 Not routinely done because can cause 
infection
 Some states do not permit medical 
assistants to perform catheterization
 Usually done in physician's office for 
diagnostic purposes
 Specially prepared catheterization kits 
have all necessary instruments and 
supplies.
19


Apply Your Knowledge
A patient has returned to the office and is 
complaining of not being able to empty her 
bladder after her hysterectomy.  The 
physician has asked you do a catheterization 
of her bladder. Why?

20


Apply Your Knowledge ­Answer
A patient has returned to the office and is 
complaining of not being able to empty her 
bladder after her hysterectomy.  The 
physician has asked you do a catheterization 
of her bladder. Why?
Catheterization is used to empty a bladder if
the patient is unable to do so.
21


Chain of Custody
 You may need to obtain urine specimens 
for drug and alcohol analysis for 
medicolegal matters
 If procedure not followed exactly, you 
have broken the chain and urine is not 
admissible.
 Thoroughly explain procedure and have 
the patient sign consent form
22


Urinalysis
Evaluation of urine to obtain 
information about body health 
and disease
Three types of testing:
 Physical
 Chemical
 Microscopic
23


Preservation and Storage
Changes that affect 
the chemical or 
microscopic 
properties of urine 
occur if urine is 
kept at room 
temperature for 
more than 1 hour

Refrigeration – most 
common method for 
storing and preserving 
urine 
It prevents bacterial 
growth for  24 hours.
After 24 hours use 
chemical preservation
24


Normal Values of Urine
 Normal values of various 
elements have been 
established
 Average adult daily urine 
output is 1250 mL/24 hours
 Intake and output should be 
approximately the same

25


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×