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OECD economic surveys netherlands 2018

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OECD ECONOMIC SURVEYS: NETHERLANDS 2018 © OECD 2018


1. MAKING EMPLOYMENT MORE INCLUSIVE IN THE NETHERLANDS

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OECD ECONOMIC SURVEYS: NETHERLANDS 2018 © OECD 2018



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ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION
AND DEVELOPMENT
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OECD PUBLISHING, 2, rue André-Pascal, 75775 PARIS CEDEX 16
(10 2018 19 1 P) ISBN 978-92-64-30258-7 – 2018


OECD Economic Surveys

NETHERLANDS
The Netherlands is experiencing strong growth and tight labour markets, with favourable economic prospects
and sound public finances. But there are downward financial risks to the economic outlook and the country
is exposed to Brexit. Looking forward, reforms are needed to move toward a more inclusive society in the
context where digitalisation and globalisation will alter the functioning of the economy. The tax system needs
to be streamlined to support growth, without increasing inequality. Labour-market inclusiveness could also be
enhanced along several dimensions. A combination of tax and regulatory reforms would ensure a better job
quality for the self-employed and workers on temporary contracts without discouraging these types of work.
There is also scope to reduce the large gender gap in part time work and enhance skills of vulnerable workers.
Finally, adressing population ageing will also require reforms to occupational pension plans and ensuring an
adequate supply fo health professionals.
SPECIAL FEATURE: LABOUR MARKET INCLUSIVENESS

Consult this publication on line at http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eco_surveys-nld-2018-en.
This work is published on the OECD iLibrary, which gathers all OECD books, periodicals and statistical databases.
Visit www.oecd-ilibrary.org for more information.

Volume 2018/18
July 2018

ISSN 0376-6438
2018 SUBSCRIPTION
(18 ISSUES)
ISBN 978-92-64-30258-7
10 2018 19 1 P

9HSTCQE*dacfih+



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