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Socio-Economic
Perspectives on
Consumer Engagement
and Buying Behavior
Hans Ruediger Kaufmann
University of Applied Management Studies Mannheim, Germany & University
of Nicosia, Cyprus
Mohammad Fateh Ali Khan Panni
City University, Bangladesh

A volume in the Advances in Marketing, Customer
Relationship Management, and E-Services
(AMCRMES) Book Series


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Coverage

• E-Service Innovation
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Titles in this Series


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Strategic Uses of Social Media for Improved Customer Retention
Wafaa Al-Rabayah (Independent Researcher, Jordan) Rawan Khasawneh (Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan) Rasha Abu-shamaa (Yarmouk University, Jordan) and Izzat Alsmadi (Boise State University, USA)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2017 • 311pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522516866) • US $180.00 (our price)
Analyzing Children’s Consumption Behavior Ethics, Methodologies, and Future Considerations
Jony Haryanto (President University, Indonesia) and Luiz Moutinho (Dublin City University, Ireland)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2017 • 278pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522509936) • US $165.00 (our price)
Handbook of Research on Leveraging Consumer Psychology for Effective Customer Engagement
Norazah Mohd Suki (Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2017 • 374pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522507468) • US $230.00 (our price)
Handbook of Research on Strategic Retailing of Private Label Products in a Recovering Economy
Mónica Gómez-Suárez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain) and María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz (University of
Castilla-La Mancha, Spain)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2016 • 625pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522502203) • US $330.00 (our price)
Handbook of Research on Consumerism and Buying Behavior in Developing Nations
Ayantunji Gbadamosi (University of East London, UK)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2016 • 565pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522502821) • US $235.00 (our price)
Managing Public Relations and Brand Image through Social Media
Anurag Singh (Banaras Hindu University, India) and Punita Duhan (Meera Bai Institute of Technology, India)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2016 • 353pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522503323) • US $195.00 (our price)
Handbook of Research on Promotional Strategies and Consumer Influence in the Service Sector
Upendra Singh Panwar (Shri Govindram Seksaria Institute of Technology and Science, India) Raj Kumar (Banaras
Hindu University, India) and Nilanjan Ray (Netaji Mahavidyalaya, India)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2016 • 492pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522501435) • US $335.00 (our price)
Global Marketing Strategies for the Promotion of Luxury Goods
Fabrizio Mosca (University of Turin, Italy) and Rosalia Gallo (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain)
Business Science Reference • copyright 2016 • 329pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781466699588) • US $200.00 (our price)

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List of Reviewers
Abu Zafar Mahmudul Haque, City University Bangladesh, Bangladesh
Dursun Yener, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
Sandra Maria Correia Maria Correia Loureiro, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Portugal
& Business Research Unit (BRU/UNIDE), Portugal
S.M. Riad Shams, Ural Federal University, Russia




Table of Contents

Preface.................................................................................................................................................. xvi
Acknowledgment.................................................................................................................................. xx
Section 1
Social Perspectives of Consumer Behavior and Engagement
Chapter 1
The Concept of “Consumerism” from a Consumer Activist Perspective................................................ 1
Ioanna Papasolomou, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Chapter 2
Social Impact in Consumer Behaviour-Consumer Boycotts as a Consumerism Activity:.................... 22
Dursun Yener, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
Chapter 3
Fuel Efficient Vehicles: The Role of Social Marketing......................................................................... 36
Lisa Watson, University of Regina, Canada

Anne M. Lavack, Thompson Rivers University, Canada
Chapter 4
Customer Satisfaction in the Consumption of Green Products.............................................................. 59
Violeta Sima, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiești, Romania
Ileana Georgiana Gheorghe, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiești, Romania
Section 2
Consumer Behavior and Engagement in the Nexus of Marketing and Technology
Chapter 5
Marketing 4.0: Enhancing Consumer-Brand Engagement through Big Data Analysis......................... 94
Ana Isabel Jiménez-Zarco, Open University of Catalonia, Spain
Asher Rospigliosi, Brighton University, UK
María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz, University of Castilla la Mancha, Spain
Alicia Izquierdo-Yusta, University of Burgos, Spain






Chapter 6
Effective Surveillance Management during Service Encounters: A Conceptual Framework............. 118
Angelo Bonfanti, University of Verona, Italy
Chapter 7
Consumer Information Systems Research Agenda: Meeting Challenges for Interactive Television
Service Development........................................................................................................................... 140
Tuure Tuunanen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Michael David Myers, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Chapter 8
Consumer Information Systems as Services: Study of Emerging IPTV Market in New Zealand....... 154
Tuure Tuunanen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Lesley Gardner, University of Auckland, Australia
Martin Bastek, DEVK, Germany
Chapter 9
About the E-commerce Activities in Finnish Lapland - Perspectives of Consumers and
Entrepreneurs: E-Commerce in Lapland............................................................................................. 175
Rauno Rusko, University of Lapland, Finland
Joni Pekkala, University of Lapland, Finland
Section 3
Consumer Behavior and Engagement from a Macro Economic Context
Chapter 10
Do Stock Markets Comove in Emerging Economies?......................................................................... 197
Sadullah Çelik, Marmara University, Turkey
Emel Baydan, Marmara University, Turkey
Chapter 11
Nowcasting Capacity Utilization in Turkey: A Continuous Wavelet Analysis.................................... 214
Özlem Taşseven, Doğuş University, Turkey
Section 4
Consumer Behavior and Engagement: Industry and Corporate Cases
Chapter 12
Consumption and Well-Being: Collecting Experiences Rather Than Material Possessions............... 248
Sandra Maria Correia Loureiro, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Business
Research Unit (BRU/UNIDE) and SOCIUS, Portugal
Chapter 13
The Effect of the Marketing Strategy in Performance of the Pharmaceutical Sector.......................... 278
Irene Samanta, Piraeus University of Applied Sciences, Greece




Chapter 14

The Aural Nature of Atmosphere in a Retail Setting........................................................................... 290
Sanda Renko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Tomislav Gregur, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Chapter 15
Enhancing Retailer-Consumers Relationship through Everyday Sustainability: McDonald’s in
Italy...................................................................................................................................................... 312
Elena Candelo, University of Turin, Italy
Cecilia Casalegno, University of Turin, Italy
Chiara Civera, University of Turin, Italy
Chapter 16
Conquering the Digital Customer: How Zara Is Confronting the Digital Innovation Revolution....... 334
Eric Viardot, EADA Business School, Spain
Petra A. Nylund, University of Vic, Spain
Compilation of References................................................................................................................ 355
About the Contributors..................................................................................................................... 412
Index.................................................................................................................................................... 418


Detailed Table of Contents

Preface.................................................................................................................................................. xvi
Acknowledgment.................................................................................................................................. xx
Section 1
Social Perspectives of Consumer Behavior and Engagement
Chapter 1
The Concept of “Consumerism” from a Consumer Activist Perspective................................................ 1
Ioanna Papasolomou, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
The chapter defines the concept of ‘consumerism’ and discusses its different perspectives which emerged
during its historical development. The author adopts the second perspective of consumerism which posits
that consumerism is a movement aimed at safeguarding the interests and rights of consumers. This view

is closely related to the concept of social responsibility (CSR) and subsequently societal marketing. There
is evidence in the literature to suggest that in an era of increasing social problems and environmental
challenges, there is a need for CSR and sustainable marketing. In fact, the second definition of consumerism
is inextricably linked with CSR and societal marketing. The chapter is conceptual in nature and provides
a review of some of the latest trends in the field such as boycotting, sustainable consumption, internet
activism, anti-branding, Fair trade, green consumerism, and sustainable marketing. The discussion is
concluded by providing some suggestions to practitioners and directions for future research.
Chapter 2
Social Impact in Consumer Behaviour-Consumer Boycotts as a Consumerism Activity:.................... 22
Dursun Yener, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
Consumerism is not a new concept for marketing, but its importance is growing in the recent years.
Researchers have studied the phenomenon of consumerism from within different dimensions. However,
its relationship with social impact theory and consumer boycotts has not been dealt with accurately.
Social impact can be defined as the effect of people on other people. A consumer boycott is a type of
consumer behaviour in which consumers collectively prefer not to use their purchasing power towards a
product, brand or all products of a country and boycott them. Motivations for participating in boycotts
differ in accordance with various factors such as consumers’ beliefs, needs or attitudes. Organizing a
boycott and calling for people’s participation is much easier today than it used to be in the past. Since






consumer boycotts is a type of consumer behaviour and consumers are affected various factors including
people in their family or friends or members in their reference groups, they can be thought a derivation
of social impact.
Chapter 3
Fuel Efficient Vehicles: The Role of Social Marketing......................................................................... 36
Lisa Watson, University of Regina, Canada

Anne M. Lavack, Thompson Rivers University, Canada
Consumers have been slow to switch to more fuel efficient vehicles, in spite of the threat of a future global
shortage of fossil fuels. To understand consumer reluctance to adopt hybrid automotive technology, this
chapter begins by reviewing consumer decision-making with regard to consumer automotive purchases.
We examine the market for fuel efficient vehicles (FEVs) and alternate fuel vehicles (AFVs), including a
discussion of consumer willingness to trade personal comfort in order to buy more fuel efficient vehicles,
and consumer price sensitivity with regard to purchasing higher-priced alternative fuel vehicles including
hybrid-electric vehicles. We discuss the tenuous link between environmental attitudes and behavior, and
outline the role of social marketing in creating behavior change relating to automotive purchase decisions.
Chapter 4
Customer Satisfaction in the Consumption of Green Products.............................................................. 59
Violeta Sima, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiești, Romania
Ileana Georgiana Gheorghe, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiești, Romania
This chapter aimed to identify those factors that determine the green consumer satisfaction, having as the
emerging point the consumer behavior definition and the sustainable development concept. The authors
propose a new approach of the dimensions of the evaluation model for customer satisfaction including
a new one, called The Green Dimension. An important goal was identifying the drivers of the consumer
purchasing. The authors identified three main areas of the green dimension of customer satisfaction. They
are related to Company, Product/service, and Price. Then some considerations regarding an integrated
approach of strategic mix from a ‘green’ perspective have been presented. According to research from
Boston Consulting Group, in order to obtain a Green Advantage, companies should enhance their strategic
mix taking into considerations green planning, green processes, green product, and green promotion. The
authors added two more elements, namely people and eco-efficiency, resulting “The Green Strategy Mix”.
Section 2
Consumer Behavior and Engagement in the Nexus of Marketing and Technology
Chapter 5
Marketing 4.0: Enhancing Consumer-Brand Engagement through Big Data Analysis......................... 94
Ana Isabel Jiménez-Zarco, Open University of Catalonia, Spain
Asher Rospigliosi, Brighton University, UK
María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz, University of Castilla la Mancha, Spain

Alicia Izquierdo-Yusta, University of Burgos, Spain
Marketing evolves in parallel with technology. During the last five years, Marketing 3.0 has become the
most innovative marketing approach, but of growing, is research focusing on Marketing 4.0: the marketing
of big data. Much has been speculated, but academic journals have published little about Marketing




4.0. Maybe, because the total understanding of Marketing 4.0 requires: firstly, a depth knowledge about
the evolution of marketing, especially about Marketing 3.0, and secondly, an analysis of how a range
of technology –not only the Internet and social media- can be used to design marketing strategies that
enhance the brand-consumer relationship. Taking into account how consumers’ behavior has been changing
since the beginning of this century, this chapter seeks to review Marketing 4.0 concepts, analyzing how
big data can be used to enhance the consumer-brand relationship.
Chapter 6
Effective Surveillance Management during Service Encounters: A Conceptual Framework............. 118
Angelo Bonfanti, University of Verona, Italy
This chapter aims to theoretically examine effective surveillance management (ESM) during service
encounters within the servicescape and provide a conceptual framework for the study of this topic in a
service management perspective. It analyses antecedents, dimensions and effects of ESM. This study
especially proposes as antecedents both improving customer service experience along with meeting
customers’ need for security and implementing a surveillance service-oriented strategy that includes secure
and safe servicescape design, deterrent communication, and trained and motivated security staff. This
chapter suggests also that the dimensions of ESM (customer-physical service environment encounters,
customer-technological surveillance systems encounters, and customer-security staff encounters)
contribute to enhancing service quality, experience quality, and staff productivity. The integration of
these dimensions, antecedents, and effects create a theoretically grounded framework that can serve as
a starting point for future studies about this topic in the field of service management.
Chapter 7
Consumer Information Systems Research Agenda: Meeting Challenges for Interactive Television

Service Development........................................................................................................................... 140
Tuure Tuunanen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Michael David Myers, University of Auckland, New Zealand
We suggest that a new type of information system appears to be increasing in importance, that of consumer
information systems. Compared with traditional information systems development approaches, where the
focus is on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational processes, design for consumer
information systems focuses more on the enjoyment, pleasure and purchases of the consumer. We argue
that the shift in focus from users to consumers in consumer information systems calls for a significant
re-appraisal of our current information systems development methods. Hence, this chapter proposes a
new research agenda for IS researchers focusing on the development of consumer information systems.
The expected contributions include new insights into effective management processes for service design,
a better understanding of issues of integration of information systems development practices used to
develop consumer information systems, and the development of methods for requirements discovery
for service innovation.




Chapter 8
Consumer Information Systems as Services: Study of Emerging IPTV Market in New Zealand....... 154
Tuure Tuunanen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Lesley Gardner, University of Auckland, Australia
Martin Bastek, DEVK, Germany
Consumer Information Systems (CIS) are a type of information systems that provides services to consumers
instead of addressing users in traditional organizational settings, such as Internet based television. Services
typically involve a trade-off between achieving high service productivity and quality. The use of service
mass customization to successfully address these issues of both productivity and quality in a service
context is proposed. We suggest that the development of Consumer Information Systems as Services
(CISaS) may achieve such service mass customization. This paper presents a conceptual framework
and investigates how it applies to a set of Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) offerings as an emerging

market in New Zealand.
Chapter 9
About the E-commerce Activities in Finnish Lapland - Perspectives of Consumers and
Entrepreneurs: E-Commerce in Lapland............................................................................................. 175
Rauno Rusko, University of Lapland, Finland
Joni Pekkala, University of Lapland, Finland
This chapter introduces E-commerce activities of consumers and entrepreneurs in Finnish Lapland. This
chapter introduces in addition to the challenges, which SMEs face while starting E-commerce activity in
the Northern Finland context, also the state of the E-commerce among consumers. Basing on the results,
six interviews and the outcomes of two questionnaires, both entrepreneurs and consumers meet the first
steps of E-commerce challenging. The most important question is what is the attainable incremental
value for the firms and consumers via E-commerce activities? Entrepreneurs meet both pushing and
pulling reasons for the first steps of E-commerce. Consumers have also noticed the incremental value of
E-commerce. Mostly the experiences of consumers are encouraging. E-commerce enlarges the available
services of sparsely populated areas of Lapland.
Section 3
Consumer Behavior and Engagement from a Macro Economic Context
Chapter 10
Do Stock Markets Comove in Emerging Economies?......................................................................... 197
Sadullah Çelik, Marmara University, Turkey
Emel Baydan, Marmara University, Turkey
Great Recession has brought the need to model and assess the financial markets with unconventional
approaches. The nature of consumer behavior in financial markets has become crucial as real and financial
sector comoving overtime was a dream of no rationality. The union of consumers looking for higher
wealth and speculative stock market participants was not a sustainable case. But, what happened to the
consumers/investors in emerging economies? This chapter assesses the behavior of emerging stock
markets during the turmoil using weekly data for Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia, South Africa
and Turkey with US as the benchmark for January 2003–March 2014. Two unconventional methods
are used for checking asymmetric contagion; the wavelet comovement and frequency domain causality.





The findings show that markets with rather high concentration of foreign investors are highly affected
but consumers were not due to smaller participation. The asymmetric contagion argument is verified
for some emerging markets as consumers/investors suffered as much as any other market participant.
Chapter 11
Nowcasting Capacity Utilization in Turkey: A Continuous Wavelet Analysis.................................... 214
Özlem Taşseven, Doğuş University, Turkey
Capacity utilization in macroeconomics is always related to inflation rate and unemployment level. However,
the Great Recession has taught us that there might have been other factors considered in determining
and/or be determined by capacity utilization. In order to further enhance Phillips Curve relationship
unconventional variables such as financial and survey variables are considered. The relationship between
capacity utilization rates and several real variables such as industrial production, gross domestic product
growth rate, unemployment rate, consumer expenditures, financial variables such as return on BIST 100
index, exchange rate of currency basket, interest rates, survey variables such as consumer consumption
index, business tendency survey and survey of expectations is investigated using data between 2006
and 2015 for Turkey. All of the above-mentioned variables indicate the production capacity and their
repercussions on other macro variables except the level of standard of living. We also highlight the
repercussions of production capacity concerning welfare state.
Section 4
Consumer Behavior and Engagement: Industry and Corporate Cases
Chapter 12
Consumption and Well-Being: Collecting Experiences Rather Than Material Possessions............... 248
Sandra Maria Correia Loureiro, Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Business
Research Unit (BRU/UNIDE) and SOCIUS, Portugal
Consumerism can be regarded as a system of beliefs and values in which emerge the idea that happiness is
best achieved through possessions. In literature, several terms related to this topic are employed, such as:
consumerism, consumption, anti-consumption and consumption communities and subjective well-being.
Therefore, the purposes of this chapter are to (i) present an overview of the research concepts, models

and main theories of this topic and (ii) discuss and inter-relate consumption and subjective well-being.
The chapter provides a proposed framework with the state-of-art on consumption, anti-consumption and
subjective well-being and a study into rural tourism context. Finally, the chapter also presents suggestions
for further research and managerial implications. In this vein, this chapter contributes to the existing
literature giving insights for a better understanding the problematic of consumers, anti-consumers and
subjective well-being as a whole and rural tourism consumption experience industry in particularly.
Chapter 13
The Effect of the Marketing Strategy in Performance of the Pharmaceutical Sector.......................... 278
Irene Samanta, Piraeus University of Applied Sciences, Greece
The aim of this research is to examine the impact of Marketing Strategy possesses in pharmaceutical
sector in Greece and define the competitive and organizational benefits accumulate from the procedure.
A quantitative survey was conducted with a sample of pharmaceutical firms. The method used is
Factor analysis and a Multivariable Regression Model in order to forecast the total performance of the




organization. The importance of the Marketing Strategy in the current economic conditions provides
a practical indication of marketing decision making and if managed carefully and closely monitored it
can offer a number of direct competitive benefits to the industries.
Chapter 14
The Aural Nature of Atmosphere in a Retail Setting........................................................................... 290
Sanda Renko, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Tomislav Gregur, University of Zagreb, Croatia
The potential influence of music in eliciting organic reactions has been appreciated since ancient times.
Knowing that consumers typically receive exposure to many hours of music each day, scientists and
marketers have recognized its potential in consumer behaviour and decision making. Literature suggests
that customers like hearing music when they shop, and feel that the retailer providing music cares about
them. Retailers have to work diligently to keep their stores favourable in the mind of consumers. Both
practitioners and researchers supported the argument that music is a beneficial element in the use of

atmospherics in business. Based on the empirical research this chapter provides an insight into the role
of music as an important element in retail store atmosphere. The chapter explains the complex character
of music, its classifications and key variables, and interaction with other atmospheric cues. The chapter
concludes that music has a significant influence on consumer behavior, and that retailers must ensure
that they are playing music that their target markets like in their stores.
Chapter 15
Enhancing Retailer-Consumers Relationship through Everyday Sustainability: McDonald’s in
Italy...................................................................................................................................................... 312
Elena Candelo, University of Turin, Italy
Cecilia Casalegno, University of Turin, Italy
Chiara Civera, University of Turin, Italy
The chapter aims at investigating the effects that the Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility
and Sustainability exerts on consumers’ perception considering the fast food industry in Italy. the
McDonald’s case study has been developed through managerial interviews and formal documents
analysis in order to report on its strategies for CSR activities implementation and their communication
in Italy. Moreover, through surveys conducted in Italy, the case study has been tested on a particular
group of young consumers - Generation Z - less influenced by the past McDonald’s activity in order to
demonstrate how communications of sustainability are better believed and perceived, when a brand has
a long tradition of misperceptions.
Chapter 16
Conquering the Digital Customer: How Zara Is Confronting the Digital Innovation Revolution....... 334
Eric Viardot, EADA Business School, Spain
Petra A. Nylund, University of Vic, Spain
This case study illustrates the effectiveness of pursuing a customer centric marketing approach in order to
achieve long term strategic success and global market leadership in the fashion industry. The case study
provides the most significant elements of Zara’s history. Then it describes the competitive environment.
Next it reveals how Zara has set up a unique, lean, and agile supply chain strategy in order to deliver





new products on a very frequent basis and faster than any of its competitors, as fashion customers expect
constant changes. Then the case study details the customer centric marketing strategy, with the use of
customers as the source of the inspiration for fashion design, the central role of the stores to build a very
high level of trust with its customers, which is used by Zara to make a distinctive brand strategy. Finally,
the case study discusses the new challenges of Zara to adapt its customer centric marketing strategy to
the digital market.
Compilation of References................................................................................................................ 355
About the Contributors..................................................................................................................... 412
Index.................................................................................................................................................... 418


xvi

Preface

In this modern new trend of marketing practices marketing dimensions are changing and the new horizons
are appearing in consumer behavioral contexts/perspectives. As consumer behavior is the cornerstone
of any marketing domain, the strategies, tools, concepts and services of consumer engagement and their
buying behavior are now being influenced by a variety of new emerging factors and antecedents. This
research oriented book will delineate some new emerging trends relating to consumer buying behavior
which are enhanced versions of the previously published IGI Global chapters though there are three
new fresh submissions where two chapters are related to consumer behavior and engagement from a
macroeconomic context and one on marketing strategy influence on pharmaceutical sector. To this vein,
this book is illustrating some interesting new perspectives like: consumer behavior on some basic social
perspectives, from macro perspectives, innovative, digital and technological platform in the context
of some industry and corporate cases. This book is providing some insights on new dimensions and
emerging contexts on the socioeconomic perspectives on the consumer engagement and behavior. The
book has mainly a strong international orientation representing about 29 chapter authors from around
13 countries like Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, New Zealand, Portugal,

Romania, Spain, Turkey, and UK.
The book is contributing in the area or discipline by providing some new trendy topics on some very
novel and innovative perspectives of consumer engagement and buying behavior which illustrates an
overall picture from the socio-economic perspective as well. In this regard, the book demonstrates some
interesting contexts like fundamental concepts on consumerism, consumer boycotts or activism, customer
satisfaction and consumption of green products. The book also contains some vital chapters in the area
consumer behavior and engagement from marketing and technological perspective like marketing 4.0,
consumer information system, surveillance in service encounters, e-commerce etc. In addition to this
the book reveals about consumer engagement and buying behavior from macroeconomic perspective
and finally the book delineates some interesting cases on tourism sector, pharmaceutical sector, retailing
sector and technological sector.

TARGET AUDIENCE
The book can be seen as a collection of some conceptual, empirical and case studies on trendy contexts
of consumer engagement and buying behavior in the canvas of socio economic context. As a result, the
book is expected to serve as a high level reference to the University library, researchers and research
students. Since the topic of the book covers some new innovative dimensions on consumer behavioral




Preface

studies, it will also help to prepare an upper-level course supplement in the marketing discipline like
consumer behavior, marketing management, strategic marketing or international/global marketing. Finally,
the book reveals these new modern perspectives, tools and concepts on consumer behavior, thus, it will
be a useful resource and reference to the marketing practitioners, for example, in the area of Marketing
Management, Innovative, Strategic Marketing and Marketing Communications.

OBJECTIVES/PURPOSE OF THIS BOOK

This book contains cutting edge contributions on some new perspectives on dimensions on consumer
engagement and buying behavior from both theoretical/conceptual context and corporate and industrial
cases. Hence, it will serve as a comprehensive guide and reference to both academics and practitioners
since it will expand their understanding on the role of these different cutting edge consumer behavior
concepts and studies as learning tools for the academics, marketing students and marketing practitioners.
The book contains 16 chapters critically engaging the reader with new modern dimensions on consumer behavior from socio economic perspective under 4 different sections.
The structure of the book has been designed to achieve the overall objectives of the book as to provide
deeper conceptual understanding of Consumer Engagement and Buying Behavior as well as revealing
different conceptual/ theoretical frameworks and some interesting industrial and corporate cases.

RATIONALE OF THE SEQUENCE OF THE CHAPTERS
WITHIN THE DIFFERENT SECTIONS
Section 1 ‘Social Perspectives of Consumer Behavior and Engagement’ begins with a contribution
by Ioanna Papasolomou (Chapter 1) representing the consumer activism. This chapter delineates the
concept of consumerism as consumer movement that has a far-reaching effect on consumer behavior
which closely stays in socio-economic context. The chapter reveals all the necessaries of consumerism
integrated part of consumer movement.
Crystallizing the basic importance of consumer activism and consumer movement Chapter 2 of the
section by Dursun Yener illustrates consumer boycotts as a specific dominant tool of consumer activism
or movement. In this perspective, the chapter has clarified the definition of consumer boycotts as well
as the motivational factors for participating in boycotts.
The third chapter by Lisa Watson and Anne M. Lavack of the section illustrates the fuel-efficient
vehicles and its roles on the social marketing. This chapter examines the market for fuel efficient vehicles
(FEVs) and alternate fuel vehicles (AFVs), including a discussion of consumer willingness to trade personal comfort in order to buy more fuel-efficient vehicles, and consumer price sensitivity with regard to
purchasing higher-priced alternative fuel vehicles including hybrid-electric vehicles.
The last chapter of the section (Chapter 4) by Violeta Sima and Ileana Georgiana Gheorghe has
explained the customer satisfaction level in consumption of green products, the applied chapters of the
previous chapters. In this chapter the authors propose a new approach of the dimensions of the evaluation
model for customer satisfaction including a new one, called The Green Dimension. An important goal was
identifying the drivers of the consumer purchasing. The authors identified three main specific levels of

the green dimension of customer satisfaction. They are related to: Company, Product/service, and Price.
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Preface

Section 2 ‘Consumer Behavior and Engagement in the Nexus of Marketing and Technology’ starts
with a very trendy topic by Ana Isabel Jiménez-Zarco, Asher Rospigliosi, María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz
and Alicia Izquierdo-Yusta (Chapter 5) of consumer behavioral study marketing 4.0 in enhancing
consumer-brand engagement through the tool of big data analysis. The chapter is particularly discussing the means of understanding marketing 4.0 and how it is growing and how a range of technologies
including internet and social media can be used for this innovative marketing strategy and to enhance
consumer brand relationship.
Interlinking the previous chapter the second chapter of this section (Chapter 6) by Angelo Bonfanti
focuses on significance of effective surveillance in service encounters. The chapter has proposed a theoretical/conceptual framework that has provided a solid ground identifying some significant/important
dimensions of service management.
The very next chapter (Chapter 7) by Tuure Tuunanen and Michael D. Myers, has focused on consumer information systems in a particular sector, from more conceptual, to a particular sector, interactive
television. In fact, the chapter aims to pursue this agenda by primarily using design science research,
supplemented by other research methods as needed. The expected contributions include new insights
into effective management processes for service design, a better understanding of issues of integration
of information systems development practices used to develop consumer information systems, and the
development of methods for requirements discovery for service innovation. These three components aim
to contribute to a holistic evaluation of consumer information systems.
The next Chapter of the section (Chapter 8) by Tuure Tuunanen, Lesley Gardner and Martin Bastek
has revealed the consumer information system in a particular emerging market in New Zealand. In fact,
this chapter is providing a picture regarding consumer information by providing a sort of empirical
evidence though initially presents a theoretical framework in the earlier stage. Thus, this chapter can be
considered as an immediate application of the conceptual discussions of consumer information system
outlined in the previous chapter.
The last chapter of the section (Chapter 9) by Rauno Rusko and Joni Pekkala is an entire comprehensive empirical study of the nexus of marketing and technology. The chapter focuses on the activities of
e-commerce from both the part of consumers and entrepreneurs in a Northern Finland. Through a detail

empirical investigation, the chapter has also pointed out the challenges that SMEs face while starting
e-commerce activities in Northern Finland. Thus, this chapter is a source of detail empirical investigation and data of the conceptual developments of the section made by the earlier chapters of the section.
Section 3 ‘Consumer Behavior and Engagement from a macroeconomic context’ contains two chapters
from a broader socio-economic perspective. The first chapter of the section (Chapter 10) by Sadullah
Çelik and Emel Baydan assesses the behavior of emerging stock markets during the turmoil using weekly
data for Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia, South Africa and Turkey with US as the benchmark for
January 2003–March 2014 while the last chapter of this section (Chapter 11) by Özlem Taşseven has
portrayed some very important socio economic factors and determinants of capacity utilization particularly
from a specific country like Turkey. In this perspective, those well important socio-economic dimension
of consumption and consumer behavior perspective like industrial production, gross domestic product
growth rate, unemployment rate, consumer expenditures, financial variables such as return on BIST 100
index, exchange rate of currency basket, interest rates, survey variables such as consumer consumption
index, business tendency survey and survey of expectations is investigated using data between 2006 and
2015 for Turkey.

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Preface

Section 4 ‘Consumer Behavior and Engagement: Industry and Corporate Cases’ is a dedicated section on industry and corporate cases which has clearly outlined some dominant case studies both from
the total industrial sector and the particular corporate context. The first chapter of the section (Chapter
12) by Sandra Maria Correia Loureiro provides a proposed framework with the state-of-art on consumption, anti-consumption and subjective well-being and a study into rural tourism context. Normally, this
chapter contributes to the existing literature giving insights for a better understanding of the problematic
of consumers, anti-consumers and subjective well-being as a whole and rural tourism consumption
experience industry in particularly. The next chapter of the section (Chapter 13) by Irene Samanta is a
comprehensive empirical study which provides a very important insight on the pharmaceutical sector in
Greece. As per the chapter the importance of the Marketing Strategy (as outlined in the chapter) in the
current economic conditions provides a practical indication of marketing decision making and if managed
carefully and closely monitored it can offer a number of direct competitive benefits to the industries.

The next chapter of the section (Chapter 14) by Sanda Renko and Tomislav Gregur provides the atmospherics perspectives of retail setting where based on the empirical research the chapter provides an
insight into the role of music as an important element in retail store atmosphere. The chapter concludes
that music has a significant influence on consumer behavior, and that retailers must ensure that they are
playing music that their target markets like in their stores.
The last two chapters (Chapter 15) by Elena Candelo, Cecilia Casalegno and Chiara Civera and
(Chapter 16) by Eric Viardot and Petra A. Nylund are specific industrial cases where Chapter 15 has
empirically investigated about the sustainability and CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) practices in
McDonald’s Italy while Chapter 16 is a detail case study on Zara regarding the effectiveness of pursuing
a customer centric marketing approach to the digital market.
The value of the book can be summarized as follows:
1. Detailed conceptual and philosophical underpinnings on new trendy consumer engagement and
buying behavior broadly from the socio-economic perspective.
2. An extensive review of conceptual and empirical studies in this area from new, dynamic innovative
and international contexts and perspectives on the consumer engagement and buying behavior.
3. Interesting insights from some industrial cases like on tourism sector, pharmaceutical sector, retail
sector and some corporate cases like McDonalds and Zara.
4. Recommendations to guide practitioners to successfully implement the concept in practice.
5. In general, a synthesis on some very new novel and emerging concepts, theories and practices related to modern era of consumer engagement and buying behavior in the socio-economic domain.

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xx

Acknowledgment

The journey of publication of an edited reference book is a challenging and very difficult task where a
collective and disciplined support is highly required. We would like to gratefully acknowledge the selfless
support of people who extended their hands to help us to make this project successful. First of all, we
sincerely thank the chapter authors for their valuable contributions to this endeavor. In this regard since

the book is mainly a collection of enhanced chapters where the chapters were previously published by
prior IGI Global Publication, we would like to express our sincere thanks to the editors of those books
from which these chapters have been selected. In addition, many thanks go to the reviewers who reviewed
three new/fresh submissions. Furthermore, we would like to acknowledge the friendly and supportive
role of the editorial staff of IGI Global, for their relentless help and support in different stages of the
manuscript development. Last, but definitely not least, we are very grateful to all our family members
for their continuous encouragement and inspiration to make this project a success.





Section 1

Social Perspectives of Consumer
Behavior and Engagement


1

Chapter 1

The Concept of “Consumerism”
from a Consumer
Activist Perspective
Ioanna Papasolomou
University of Nicosia, Cyprus

ABSTRACT
The chapter defines the concept of ‘consumerism’ and discusses its different perspectives which emerged

during its historical development. The author adopts the second perspective of consumerism which posits
that consumerism is a movement aimed at safeguarding the interests and rights of consumers. This view
is closely related to the concept of social responsibility (CSR) and subsequently societal marketing. There
is evidence in the literature to suggest that in an era of increasing social problems and environmental
challenges, there is a need for CSR and sustainable marketing. In fact, the second definition of consumerism is inextricably linked with CSR and societal marketing. The chapter is conceptual in nature and
provides a review of some of the latest trends in the field such as boycotting, sustainable consumption,
internet activism, anti-branding, Fair trade, green consumerism, and sustainable marketing. The discussion is concluded by providing some suggestions to practitioners and directions for future research.

INTRODUCTION
The concept of consumerism has been explored by several academics (Bloom and Greyser, 1981; Bloom
and Smith, 1986; Greyser and Diamond, 1974; Greyser, 1977). The term consumerism is linked to the
behavior of organizations and the expectations of the society. Corporations should identify and define
their purpose and objectives in a way that align with the expectations of society. If customers lack trust
in businesses because they are not meeting the customers’ and society’s expectations then they may be
perceived as unnecessary, they may be heavily criticized, accused and boycotted. In the 21st century
consumers have become more caring and socially aware, moving towards a more responsible and responsive attitude to issues which may not directly concern them such as Third World exploitation. The
mass media and social media highlight that there is increased consumer and public concern about health
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2139-6.ch001

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The Concept of “Consumerism” from a Consumer Activist Perspective

issues, animal welfare, environmental protection, child labour and ethical trading. The current trend in
Europe, largely due to the current economic crisis and the masses of refugees moving from the Middle
East into EU countries, is for consumers to engage in more socially responsible behavior, move away
from leading a life of excessive consumption and materialism, towards more enduring values such as
respect, compassion, and empathy. Similarly, there is evidence in the press and literature suggesting that

the business sector has become more responsive to social and environmental problems and engage more
in societal and sustainable marketing. Consumerism has the potential to play a constructive role in building a sustainable business environment by emphasizing for example consumer awareness, fair trading,
codes of conduct and ethical business practices. It motivates managers to adopt a new way of thinking
beyond the narrow boundaries of generating short-term sales and profits, and more towards adopting a
sustainable approach aimed at safeguarding the quality of life of future generations.

EVOLUTION AND FUNDAMENTAL DEFINITIONS OF CONSUMERISM
When the term “Consumerism” first made its appearance in the academic literature it was coined with
the over-consumption of goods and services. Veblen (1899) studied the newly emergent middle class
at the turn of the twentieth century and wrote a detailed social critique of conspicuous consumption.
According to Veblen (1899) the upper social class at the time engaged in practices of conspicuous consumption and conspicuous leisure. However, the term has acquired several meanings over time based
on different perspectives. The first perspective of consumerism views the term as:
1. The manipulative business activities to entice consumers to buy products,
2. The second perspective holds the idea that consumerism is the movement that aims as ascertaining
consumers’ rights, and
3. The third perspective refers to consumption as a way of life or ideology (Yani-de-Soriano and
Slater, 2009).

The First Definition: The “Manipulative Perspective”
Vance Packard (1957) stated that consumerism is related to strategies and techniques that aim at encouraging consumers to consume more hence, expanding their needs and desires. According to this
view, consumerism is associated with the overuse of promotion, aggressive selling and advertising.
Packard (1957) expressed his concern in relation to the overuse of advertising highlighting the risk of
manipulating customers into over-consuming. The evolution of the marketing management orientation
was characterized by a phase of aggressive selling whereby marketers were mostly concerned with stock
levels and as a result businesses focused their efforts on aggressive and promotion. This philosophy,
which was identified by Kotler et al. (2008), has been known as the selling orientation. This orientation
nourished the “manipulative perspective” whereby businesses focused on aggressive selling rather than
customer focus which was at the heart of the marketing orientation and stipulated intense criticism for
exploitative and manipulative behavior on the part of businesses.


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The Concept of “Consumerism” from a Consumer Activist Perspective

The Second Definition: Consumers’ Movement in the USA
In an effort to eliminate manipulative techniques and aggressive marketing, the US public authorities
enacted legislation for the protection of consumers’ rights. At the same time consumers joined efforts
and formed associations to protect themselves hence, providing the foundation for the second definition
of consumerism. This definition is founded on reactions portrayed by the society to the type of marketing used in the first definition. According to this perspective “consumerism is defined as a “social
movement seeking to augment the rights and powers of buyers in relation to sellers (Kotler, 1972, p.
49). Later on, Kotler (2000, p. 152) redefined consumerism as follows: “an organized movement of
citizens and government to strengthen the rights and powers of buyers in relation to sellers.” Mcllhenny
(1990) describes consumerism as a citizens’ movement with demands on suppliers of goods and services
with social, ecological and political implications. The consumer movement emerged in the USA with
President Kennedy’s 1962 call for a “Bill of Consumer Rights” (Lampman, 1988). This specific view
of consumerism, known also as consumer activism, is similar to another social movement known as
environmentalism, which is defined as: “an organized movement of concerned citizens and government
agencies to protect and improve people’s living environment (Kotler et al., 2005, p. 184). Both movements are closely related to the “societal marketing concept”, A philosophy that holds that businesses
today should attempt to balance the organizational goals for profitability, customers’ needs and society’s
wellbeing (Kotler and Keller, 2006, p. 22).

The Third Definition: The Consumer Culture
According to Yani-de-Soriano and Slater (2009) the third definition of consumerism refers to consumption as a means for happiness and wellbeing. Murphy (2000, p. 636) defines this type of consumerism
as: “the doctrine that the self cannot be complete without a wealth of consumer goods and that goals
can be achieved and problems solved through proper consumption.” He moves on to suggest that from
an economic perspective this consumer culture reflects the emphasis of economies from exchange or
production to consumption. From a social perspective, the notion of a consumer culture is founded on the
notion of acquiring products as a form of communicating the owner’s wealth and using them as “status

symbols”. Consumers use these products as a form of signaling to others their social standing and power.
Slater (1997, p. 31) posits that “it is partially through the use of goods and services that we formulate
ourselves as social identities and display these identities.” The third definition of consumerism links
personal happiness with material consumption. Abela (2006) and Burroughs and Rindfleisch (2002)
claim that “consumption as a means of happiness and well-being can have detrimental consequences
for consumers and society”.
As stated in the abstract, the chapter examines the concept of consumerism in the context of consumer movement/consumer activism. This perspective uses the terms “consumerism” and “consumer
protection” or “consumer activism” as synonyms. The movement is undertaken on behalf of consumers
to promote and protect consumer rights. It promotes the adoption of practices such as honest packaging
and advertising, product guarantees, improved safety standards, environmental protection, and not testing products on animals. In essence, consumer activism is a movement aimed at regulating the products,
services, methods, and standards of manufacturers, sellers, and advertisers in the interests of the buyer.

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The Concept of “Consumerism” from a Consumer Activist Perspective

CONSUMER ATTITUDES/CONCERNS ON CONSUMERISM ISSUES
Over the last decade, a number of studies attempted to investigate the consumer attitudes towards marketing and consumerism issues (Keown, 1982; Dubinsky and Hensel, 1984). The majority of these studies
were carried out in different national settings.
Barksdale and Darden (1972) showed that 70% of respondents in the USA believed that most manufacturers were not satisfactorily handling complaints associated with the quality of products, reliability
and safety. It was widely shared that firms were promoting products that were potentially dangerous
for people’s health and life. Studies that were carried out in Venezuela and Norway (Arndt et al. 1980),
England (French et al., 1982) and in other countries (Barksdale et al. 1982) revealed common problems
associated with high prices, lack of product quality, lack of adequate repair and maintenance services,
deceptive advertising and ineffective handling of complaints. Wee and Chan (1989) identified that consumers in Hong Kong tend to have more favorable attitudes towards marketing than those in the USA
mainly due to better marketing practices in Hong Kong. Studies carried out by Anon (2003); Bhushan
(2003); Brunk (1973); Koslow (2000); and Lisa (2004) support that the majority of consumers share
the perception that corporations do not practice business ethics and they are not socially responsible.

Darley and Johnson (1993) studied marketing and consumerism issues in multiple countries: Singapore,
India, Nigeria and Kenya. They found differences among the countries but some degree of disagreement
was identified as well. In a study carried out by Uray and Menguc (1996) it was evident that consumers also had negative perceptions towards the consumerism practices. Varadarajan et al. (1990) showed
that consumers were dissatisfied with marketing practices and desired greater government regulation. In
general, consumers’ degree of awareness towards consumerism issues varies significantly across demographic profiles especially in terms of age, gender, education qualification and income level. This finding
was corroborated by Panni (2006) who found that consumers’ concerns towards the consumerism issues
significantly vary across demographic profiles. Bhuian et al. (2001) revealed that young adults with a
business education background in Saudi Arabia had more favourable perceptions towards marketing and
consumerism than those with a non-business background. Evidence generated by empirical studies for
example Berkowitz and Lutterman (1968); Bourgeois and Barnes (1979); Anderson and Cunningham
(1972); found that the individuals who are most likely to express consumerist views toward marketing
tend to be younger. Authors like Hustad and Pessemier (1973); Bourgeois and Barnes (1979); Peattie
(1992); and Ruiz, Arcas and Cuestas (2001) claimed that the socially conscious consumers are typically
female. Anderson and Cunningham (1972); Hustad and Pessemier (1973); Kinnear et al., (1974); and
The Roper Organization (1971) found that consumerists tend to have higher socio-economic profiles
(Berkowitz and Lutterman1968; Bourgeois and Barnes 1979). Knauer (1971) argued that in general
consumerist issues tend to attract the better educated and better informed consumers.
At the micro level, studies have explored consumer dissatisfaction with and complaints about specific
products and services. At a macro level, national and cross-national studies have addressed consumer
attitudes towards marketing practices, consumerism and government regulations (Barksdale 1982; French
et al 1982; Gaski and Etzel 1986). While most studies reported to date are cross-sectional in nature,
there have been recent attempts to provide a longitudinal perspective of consumers’ attitudes towards
marketing. In a study carried out by Lysonski et al. (2003) it was found that consumers appeared to be
less negative about marketing and consumerism issues since 1986. This is largely due to the fact that
marketers have adopted a more proactive approach towards consumers’ complaints and discontents.
The study revealed that consumers have relatively more favorable attitudes toward product quality and
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