Tải bản đầy đủ

Handbook of research on policies and practices for sustainable economic growth and regional development


Handbook of Research
on Policies and Practices
for Sustainable Economic
Growth and Regional
Development
George M. Korres
University of Aegean, Greece
Elias Kourliouros
University of Aegean, Greece
Maria P. Michailidis
University of Nicosia, Cyprus

A volume in the Advances in Finance, Accounting,
and Economics (AFAE) Book Series


Published in the United States of America by
IGI Global
Business Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global)
701 E. Chocolate Avenue

Hershey PA, USA 17033
Tel: 717-533-8845
Fax: 717-533-8661
E-mail: cust@igi-global.com
Web site: http://www.igi-global.com
Copyright © 2017 by IGI Global. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or distributed in
any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, without written permission from the publisher.
Product or company names used in this set are for identification purposes only. Inclusion of the names of the products or
companies does not indicate a claim of ownership by IGI Global of the trademark or registered trademark.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
CIP Data Pending
ISBN: 978-1-5225-2458-8
eISBN: 978-1-5225-2459-5
This book is published in the IGI Global book series Advances in Finance, Accounting, and Economics (AFAE) (ISSN:
2327-5677; eISSN: 2327-5685)

British Cataloguing in Publication Data
A Cataloguing in Publication record for this book is available from the British Library.
All work contributed to this book is new, previously-unpublished material. The views expressed in this book are those of the
authors, but not necessarily of the publisher.
For electronic access to this publication, please contact: eresources@igi-global.com.


Advances in Finance,
Accounting, and Economics
(AFAE) Book Series
Ahmed Driouchi
Al Akhawayn University, Morocco

ISSN:2327-5677
EISSN:2327-5685
Mission

In our changing economic and business environment, it is important to consider the financial changes
occurring internationally as well as within individual organizations and business environments. Understanding these changes as well as the factors that influence them is crucial in preparing for our financial
future and ensuring economic sustainability and growth.
The Advances in Finance, Accounting, and Economics (AFAE) book series aims to publish comprehensive and informative titles in all areas of economics and economic theory, finance, and accounting
to assist in advancing the available knowledge and providing for further research development in these
dynamic fields.



Coverage
• Economics of Agriculture and Biotechnology
• Field Research
• Economic Indices and Quantitative Economic Methods
• Finance and Accounting in SMEs
• Finance
• Economic Theory
• Economics of Innovation and Knowledge
• Risk Analysis and Management
• Fiscal Policy
• Interest Rates and Annuities

IGI Global is currently accepting manuscripts
for publication within this series. To submit a proposal for a volume in this series, please contact our
Acquisition Editors at Acquisitions@igi-global.com
or visit: http://www.igi-global.com/publish/.

The Advances in Finance, Accounting, and Economics (AFAE) Book Series (ISSN 2327-5677) is published by IGI Global, 701 E. Chocolate Avenue, Hershey, PA 17033-1240, USA, www.igi-global.com. This series is composed of titles available for purchase individually; each
title is edited to be contextually exclusive from any other title within the series. For pricing and ordering information please visit http://www.
igi-global.com/book-series/advances-finance-accounting-economics/73685. Postmaster: Send all address changes to above address. Copyright
© 2017 IGI Global. All rights, including translation in other languages reserved by the publisher. No part of this series may be reproduced or
used in any form or by any means – graphics, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information and retrieval
systems – without written permission from the publisher, except for non commercial, educational use, including classroom teaching purposes.
The views expressed in this series are those of the authors, but not necessarily of IGI Global.


Titles in this Series

For a list of additional titles in this series, please visit: www.igi-global.com/book-series

Method of Systems Potential (MSP) Applications in Economics Emerging Research and Opportunities
Grigorii Pushnoi (Independent Researcher, Russia)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 162pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522521709) • US $135.00
Outward Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Emerging Market Economies
Tomasz Dorożyński (University of Lodz, Poland) and Anetta Kuna-Marszałek (University of Lodz, Poland)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 414pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522523451) • US $210.00
Handbook of Research on Unemployment and Labor Market Sustainability in the Era of Globalization
Füsun Yenilmez (Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Turkey) and Esin Kılıç (Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Turkey)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 474pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522520085) • US $245.00
Business Infrastructure for Sustainability in Developing Economies
Nilanjan Ray (Netaji Mahavidyalaya, India)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 343pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522520412) • US $190.00
Applied Behavioral Economics Research and Trends
Rodica Ianole (University of Bucharest, Romania)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 255pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522518266) • US $160.00
Value Relevance of Accounting Information in Capital Markets
Marianne Ojo (George Mason University, USA) and Jeanette Van Akkeren (QUT School of Accountancy, Australia)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 323pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522519003) • US $205.00
Handbook of Research on the EU’s Role and Representation in the G20 Political and Economic Climate
Abdulkadir Isik (Namik Kemal University, Turkey)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 429pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522508564) • US $310.00
Examining the Role of National Promotional Banks in the European Economy Emerging Research and Opportunities
Iustina Alina Boitan (Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)
Business Science Reference • ©2017 • 184pp • H/C (ISBN: 9781522518457) • US $120.00

701 East Chocolate Avenue, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
Tel: 717-533-8845 x100 • Fax: 717-533-8661
E-Mail: cust@igi-global.com • www.igi-global.com


Editorial Advisory Board
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Higher Military Academy, Greece
Charalambos Louca, American College – Nicosia, Cyprus
George Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece




List of Contributors

Alexiadis, Stilianos / Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece.............................................................................................................................. 240,368,380
Anagnostou, Spyros / University Hill, Greece.................................................................................... 85
Artavani, Maria-Athina / Hellenic Military Academy, Greece........................................................ 373
Belyaeva, Ksenya / NLMK Group, Russia......................................................................................... 187
Boccella, Nicola / University La Sapienza, Italy.................................................................................. 61
Burmykina, Irina / Lipetsk State Pedagogical University, Russia.................................................... 187
Chatziantoniou, Maria / University of the Aegean, Greece.............................................................. 297
Delitheou, Vasiliki / Panteion University, Greece............................................................................. 130
Demosthenous, Aliki / University of Aegean, Greece......................................................................... 51
Efthymia, Sarantakou / Hellenic Open University, Greece & Technological Educational
Institute of Athens, Greece............................................................................................................. 330
Evangelinos, Konstantinos / University of the Aegean, Greece........................................................ 297
Gantzias, George / Hellenic Open University, Greece........................................................................ 15
Ganztias, George K. / Hellenic Open University, Greece.................................................................... 72
Giannopoulou, Ioanna / NHS Community Mental Health of Peristeri, Greece............................... 157
Gioti-Papadaki, Olga / Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece..................... 240
Jones, Nikoleta / Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK............................................................ 297
Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna / University of the Aegean, Greece............................................................... 297
Katis, Panagiotis / University of the Aegean, Greece........................................................................ 190
Kokkidis, Stilianos / Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece.......................................... 380
Kokkinou, Aikaterini / Hellenic Military Academy, Greece.............................................. 259,357,373
Kontochristou, Maria / Hellenic Open University, Greece................................................................ 25
Korres, George M. / University of the Aegean, Greece...................................................................... 259
Kyriakidis, Dimitris / University of the Aegean, Greece................................................................... 216
Ladias, Christos / Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece............................. 240
Louca, Charalambos / American College, USA............................................................................... 318
Markou, Maria / Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece............................................... 380
Marmaras, Emmanuel V. / University of Crete, Greece..................................................................... 92
Matos, Ana Raquel / Centre for Social Studies, Portugal.................................................................. 100
Michailidis, Evie / University of Surrey, UK....................................................................................... 72
Michailidis, Maria P. / University of Nicosia, Cyprus......................................................................... 72
Nagopoulos, Nikos / University of the Aegean, Greece..................................................................... 297
Papadopoulou, Olga / University of the Aegean, Greece.................................................................... 40
Papanis, Efstratios / University of the Aegean, Greece..................................................................... 166






Pavlogeorgatos, Gerasimos / University of the Aegean, Greece....................................................... 259
Petracou, Electra / University of the Aegean, Greece....................................................................... 350
Prasad, Kiran / Sri Padmavati Mahila University, India.................................................................. 177
Proikaki, Marina / University of the Aegean, Greece....................................................................... 297
Roumeliotu, Myrsine / University of the Aegean, Greece................................................................. 166
Saccà, Flaminia / Tuscia University, Italy......................................................................................... 142
Salerno, Irene / University of Basilicata, Italy.................................................................................... 61
Savidou, Art. / University of Neapolis, Cyprus................................................................................. 344
Serapioni, Mauro / Centre for Social Studies, Portugal................................................................... 100
Sidiropoulos, George / University of the Aegean, Greece................................................................. 115
Skouloudis, Antonis / University of Reading, UK............................................................................. 297
Tsobanoglou, George O. / University of the Aegean, Greece........................................... 1,157,246,306
Vlachopoulou, Eirini Ioanna / University of the Aegean, Greece.............................................. 246,306
Xirouchakis, Fragkiskos / University of the Aegean, Greece........................................................... 205
Yannacopoulos, Athanasios N. / Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece................ 350
Zawieja-Żurowska, Karina / State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland..................... 230
Zimny, Artur / State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland............................................ 230


Table of Contents

Preface................................................................................................................................................. xxv
Section 1
Socio-Economic Sustainable Growth and Regional Development
Chapter 1
Approaches to the Post-WWII Labour-Based Social Economy of Greece.............................................. 1
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 2
Cultural Management and Cultural Activities: The Model “Dynamic Perception of Cultural
Activities”.............................................................................................................................................. 15
George Gantzias, Hellenic Open University, Greece
Chapter 3
Looking Beyond the Greek Crisis: Media Discourse and Political Rhetoric on “European
Solidarity”.............................................................................................................................................. 25
Maria Kontochristou, Hellenic Open University, Greece
Chapter 4
Education and Human Capital: Driver or Challenge for Development?............................................... 40
Olga Papadopoulou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 5
Education and Economic Growth: Measuring Efficiency in Education Through DEA Method........... 51
Aliki Demosthenous, University of Aegean, Greece
Chapter 6
Sustainable Urban Development: From Theory to Concrete Practice................................................... 61
Nicola Boccella, University La Sapienza, Italy
Irene Salerno, University of Basilicata, Italy







Chapter 7
Unemployed: Training and Development, Employability, and Social Support..................................... 72
Maria P. Michailidis, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Evie Michailidis, University of Surrey, UK
George K. Ganztias, Hellenic Open University, Greece
Chapter 8
Functional Urban Regions and Larger Urban Zones in Europe and Greece: The Deficient and
Fuzzy Definition of an Essential Spatial Unit........................................................................................ 85
Spyros Anagnostou, University Hill, Greece
Chapter 9
A Scenario for the Future Athens Planning: Seeking Its New International Role in the Globalized
Era.......................................................................................................................................................... 92
Emmanuel V. Marmaras, University of Crete, Greece
Section 2
Policies and Practices for Sustainable Growth
Chapter 10
Health Systems and Citizenship: Public Participation in Southern Europe......................................... 100
Ana Raquel Matos, Centre for Social Studies, Portugal
Mauro Serapioni, Centre for Social Studies, Portugal
Chapter 11
Urban and Population Growth: A Comparative Approach to the Greek Cities of 3,000-10,000
Inhabitants, After 1950........................................................................................................................ 115
George Sidiropoulos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 12
Legal Definition of the Concept of Private Productive Investment: An Inter-Comparison Study....... 130
Vasiliki Delitheou, Panteion University, Greece
Chapter 13
Changes in the Political Culture of Italian Younger Politicians.......................................................... 142
Flaminia Saccà, Tuscia University, Italy
Chapter 14
Social Impact of the Fiscal Crisis Upon the Livelihood Conditions of the Children of Greece.......... 157
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Ioanna Giannopoulou, NHS Community Mental Health of Peristeri, Greece
Chapter 15
Social Stigmatization Among Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Male and Female Patients................ 166
Efstratios Papanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Myrsine Roumeliotu, University of the Aegean, Greece




Chapter 16
From Grey to Green: Sustainable Development Perspectives From India-EU Partnerships............... 177
Kiran Prasad, Sri Padmavati Mahila University, India
Chapter 17
The New Paradigm of Corporate Culture............................................................................................ 187
Ksenya Belyaeva, NLMK Group, Russia
Irina Burmykina, Lipetsk State Pedagogical University, Russia
Section 3
Local Governance, Territorial Planning Policies, Regional Enterprises, and Social
Development
Chapter 18
Doing Business in Greece Within the Wider Context of SMEs Internationalization: A
Benchmarking Approach Between Greece and Selected OECD/EU Member Countries................... 190
Panagiotis Katis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 19
Micro-Enterprise and Micro-Innovation in a Turbulent Era: A Southern European Union
Perspective........................................................................................................................................... 205
Fragkiskos Xirouchakis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 20
Housing Submarkets and Future Demographic Developments: A Review on the Literature.............. 216
Dimitris Kyriakidis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 21
Statistical Analysis of Housing Situation in EU Member States......................................................... 230
Artur Zimny, State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland
Karina Zawieja-Żurowska, State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland
Chapter 22
Examining the Evolution of Agriculture Productivity in the European Union.................................... 240
Olga Gioti-Papadaki, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece
Christos Ladias, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
Chapter 23
Participation and in the Aegean Polynesia: Coop Community Challenges at a Time of Acute
Social Crisis......................................................................................................................................... 246
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Eirini Ioanna Vlachopoulou, University of the Aegean, Greece




Chapter 24
Spatial Planning and Regional Growth: A Benchmarking Study for North-South Aegean and 
Crete............................................................................................................................................... 259
George M. Korres, University of the Aegean, Greece
Gerasimos Pavlogeorgatos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Chapter 25
Incorporating Social Indicators of Sustainability in Public Policies for Environmentally Degraded
Areas: The Case of the Asopos River.................................................................................................. 297
Marina Proikaki, University of the Aegean, Greece
Nikoleta Jones, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
Nikos Nagopoulos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Maria Chatziantoniou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Olga-Ioanna Kalantzi, University of the Aegean, Greece
Antonis Skouloudis, University of Reading, UK
Konstantinos Evangelinos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 26
Social-Ecological Systems in Local Fisheries Communities............................................................... 306
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Eirini Ioanna Vlachopoulou, University of the Aegean, Mytilene, Greece
Section 4
New Types and Policies of Sustainable Growth: Policy Planning and Applied Research
Chapter 27
Environmental Tax Policy Reforms in the European Union................................................................ 318
Charalambos Louca, American College, USA
Chapter 28
Mechanisms for the Formation of Tourism Organization Models in Greece Through a
Comparative Analysis of Ten Greek Destinations’ Development....................................................... 330
Sarantakou Efthymia, Hellenic Open University, Greece & Technological Educational
Institute of Athens, Greece
Chapter 29
State and Corruption: National and International Aspects, Disparate Management Approaches....... 344
Art. Savidou, University of Neapolis, Cyprus
Chapter 30
A Framework for Reaching Consensus Under Uncertainty in Multi-Agent Negotiations................... 350
Electra Petracou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Athanasios N. Yannacopoulos, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece




Chapter 31
Efficiency Effects in Supply Chain Management: A Production Frontier Approach.......................... 357
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Chapter 32
Revisiting the Problem of Regional Allocation of Investment: Aggregate Efficiency or Regional
Equity?................................................................................................................................................. 368
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
Chapter 33
Heterogeneity in Supply Chain Management: An Efficiency Approach............................................. 373
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Maria-Athina Artavani, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Chapter 34
The Production of Cereals in Greece: A Shift-Share Analysis............................................................ 380
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
Stilianos Kokkidis, Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece
Maria Markou, Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece
Compilation of References................................................................................................................ 391
About the Editors............................................................................................................................... 435
Index.................................................................................................................................................... 437


Detailed Table of Contents

Preface................................................................................................................................................. xxv
Section 1
Socio-Economic Sustainable Growth and Regional Development
Chapter 1
Approaches to the Post-WWII Labour-Based Social Economy of Greece.............................................. 1
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
The current crisis in Greece, an EU member for over 30 years, has brought to the surface the character
of the Greek politico-administrative system as it handles employment, migration and associated forms
of social protection. Similarly, recent attempts at legislative reforms of the operation of social economy
enterprises have yet to be implemented, while the current legislation governing them, i.e. as Foundations,
dates back to 1939. The difficulties in recognising and regulating the social economy sector seem to emanate
from the organisation of the overall employment security system in place. The employment relationship
seems to be embedded within a bifurcated system of labour whereby the employment relationship is secure
only in the public sector while the private sector is controlled by a precarious system of labour security,
a separate health system and with its own political organisation. The lack of a unified national labour
system does not allow the formation of a national system of employment (qualifications) and, hence, a
way to overcome nepotism and the political (party) patronage system which defines, in a determining
way, labour relations. This division is maintained by the politico-administrative labour regime put in
place, under the extra-ordinary political situation that emerged after World War II (WWII). The paper
explores this hidden reality defining the organisation of the employment system in Greece, its politicoadministrative controls that seem to aim at ‘arresting’ the emergence of a social economy. This leads
to a hidden social economy of a fragmented private labour market, which is regulated separately from
the secure “public” employment sector. This rather anachronistic and discriminatory system of political
order of labour divides workers in Greece.
Chapter 2
Cultural Management and Cultural Activities: The Model “Dynamic Perception of Cultural
Activities”.............................................................................................................................................. 15
George Gantzias, Hellenic Open University, Greece
Cultural activities, the public interest and digital technology have been important factors for the development
of cultural activities in recent cultural and economic crisis. The development of digital technology affects
both the management and the marketing process of cultural activities. This paper briefly discusses the





problems faced by managers in developing cultural activities in info- communication globalization. In
particular, it analyzes the digitized cultural activities together with the social media and cloud computing.
It introduces the model for managing cultural activities which is called “Dynamic Perception of Cultural
Activities” (DPCA). Finally, it outlines the advantages and disadvantages for introducing the management
model of cultural activities i.e. DPCA in cultural organizations and institutions.
Chapter 3
Looking Beyond the Greek Crisis: Media Discourse and Political Rhetoric on “European
Solidarity”.............................................................................................................................................. 25
Maria Kontochristou, Hellenic Open University, Greece
The Greek sovereign debt crisis has not only raised concerns about the deficiencies of the European Monetary
Union (EMU) and the effects of the Eurozone crisis on member states’ politics and administration, but
also has challenged the establishment of the Eurozone itself. The crisis has revealed a lack of democratic
legitimacy whereas has severely questioned ‘Europeanness’. The paper examines solidarity as one of the
fundamental principles of the European Union (EU) and pylons of the European society and identity. In
particular, the paper discusses the concept of solidarity within the EU and examines the role of discourse
at the EU level, especially what type of discourse the EU political elites and the media have engendered
regarding European solidarity in the case of Greece.
Chapter 4
Education and Human Capital: Driver or Challenge for Development?............................................... 40
Olga Papadopoulou, University of the Aegean, Greece
In European Union, human capital along with its basic expression education has been placed high on
the policy agenda. This chapter aims to analyze the human capital in Greece, in order to provide an
integrated overview on how well Greece is operating its human capital and education targets, under the
terms of Europe 2020 strategy. Consequently, the achievement of the relevant ethnic targets is vital, for
having a “smart, sustainable, inclusive growth” in Greece.
Chapter 5
Education and Economic Growth: Measuring Efficiency in Education Through DEA Method........... 51
Aliki Demosthenous, University of Aegean, Greece
This paper aims to analyze the framework of education and to measure the efficiency of education by
means of the Data Envelopment Analysis method. The Data Envelopment Analysis is a nonparametric
method used in operational research and in economics for estimating production frontiers. It can be
used to measure empirically the efficiency of decision making units (DMUs). Measuring efficiency in
education is of high priority as substantial investments in education are made by the European Union
contributing thus to the accumulation and growth of human capital. Education, training and lifelong
learning, are important “levers” that contribute towards the economic growth and the enhancement of
competitiveness. The skills acquired by the employees through training and lifelong learning raise the
corporate competitiveness by achieving economic growth and also assist in meeting their corporate and
individual social responsibilities. The educational process at all levels is not just a simple truth that is
continuously verified. It is the basis upon which Europe is based on. It is a collective investment of high
priority which contributes to the macro and micro-economic objectives of the EU economies. It contributes
to the harmonious social growth of the EU countries and the formation of peoples’ intellectual culture.




Chapter 6
Sustainable Urban Development: From Theory to Concrete Practice................................................... 61
Nicola Boccella, University La Sapienza, Italy
Irene Salerno, University of Basilicata, Italy
The concept of participation in sustainable urban development practices is actually more and more popular
in Europe and all over the world. In parallel, there is a rapid growth of urban design and planning projects
including local communities in urban development planning activities. According to such concepts, this
paper, starting from the description of the results of field and desk researches carried out by ‘La Sapienza’
University of Rome and related to communities involvement strategies currently available in Europe,
describes and analyses a case study based on a concrete application of theoretical and methodological
approaches, and two more cases of possible application of an integrated methodology. All the projects
described concern the city of Rome.
Chapter 7
Unemployed: Training and Development, Employability, and Social Support..................................... 72
Maria P. Michailidis, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Evie Michailidis, University of Surrey, UK
George K. Ganztias, Hellenic Open University, Greece
The current paper discusses findings from an exploratory study concerning the type, frequency of use and
the impact of social networking sites on unemployed. The study’s objectives were to assess participants’
under training: usage of social networking sites, and the degree to which these helped increase their
opportunities for employability, educational enhancement, and contributed to their psychological uplift
and social support. The paper contributed to the research on social networking and the education of the
unemployed in a country where similar research is sporadic.
Chapter 8
Functional Urban Regions and Larger Urban Zones in Europe and Greece: The Deficient and
Fuzzy Definition of an Essential Spatial Unit........................................................................................ 85
Spyros Anagnostou, University Hill, Greece
In the European Union, Functional Urban Regions are important to economic and spatial planning; so is
the existence of statistical data at this spatial level, both for the European and the national policies. Still,
most European countries, like Greece, have no official delimitations for these zones - and, consecutively,
no socio-economic data produced at this level. “Larger Urban Zones”, created by Eurostat’s Urban Audit
represent the only proxy to FURs that could be used for comparable studies, but this would demand an
effort for a better harmonization and for consequent statistical series
Chapter 9
A Scenario for the Future Athens Planning: Seeking Its New International Role in the Globalized
Era.......................................................................................................................................................... 92
Emmanuel V. Marmaras, University of Crete, Greece
The paper supports the aspect that a pnning procedure is developed in Athens (Greece) the last years,
aiming to undertake the role of a semi-regional node in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. This node is
needed for the integration of the globalization western system. Τhe organization of the Olympic Games




of 2004 was the initiative for the construction of the needed infrastructures and main urban works in the
city. Legal measures regarding the administrative and labour issues were undertaken during the previous
four years in conjunction with the acquisition of the needed urban land in the coastal area of the Athens
plain, where a new CBD is under implementation. These developments are the main arguments for
supporting the aspect that Athens is now re-organized and upgraded with new urban equipment, which
will facilitate the settling of the headquarters of various multinational organizations and other private
enterprises in the Eastern Mediterranean region.
Section 2
Policies and Practices for Sustainable Growth
Chapter 10
Health Systems and Citizenship: Public Participation in Southern Europe......................................... 100
Ana Raquel Matos, Centre for Social Studies, Portugal
Mauro Serapioni, Centre for Social Studies, Portugal
This chapter presents the characteristics of the southern healthcare systems, namely of Portugal, Spain,
Italy and Greece. It briefly identifies the main processes of health reform so that readers can understand
the context in which experiences of participation in the health domain were developed.
Chapter 11
Urban and Population Growth: A Comparative Approach to the Greek Cities of 3,000-10,000
Inhabitants, After 1950........................................................................................................................ 115
George Sidiropoulos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Urban blots are the technical imprints of the city form, derived from aerial photographs. A diachronic
comparison of these urban imprints allows the generation of the development profile of the cities. When these
imprints are accompanied by the corresponding population data allow the generation of the evolutionary
history of a city the way as they actually appear and not only through descriptive characteristics. This
study refers to cities of 3000-10000 residents and takes account of urban blots of cities according to
aerial photos from 1940 until today. The population of each blot is matched with the population censuses
every ten years, carried out by the Greek Statistical Authority. This paper tries to answer the questions
if the post-war housing development accompanied equally with the population development researching
the similarity areas of the phenomenon, the classification, and the proportion of it in the Greek territory.
The study demonstrates that the residential development in post-war Greece is positive fluctuating from
minimum positive to extremely high. In contrast, the population in the corresponding urban footprint
of the same chronologies seems to be large where there is high residential development but negative
where cities presenting intermediate and low indicators. The text, initially, analyzes urban blots as a
tool of imprinting residential concentrations. Through the analysis of population data a representative
sample is being created in which the research is based. Also, urban blots are generated by digitalization.
Finally, the text analyzes the combined data of different time sections and brings out the population
results / residential blots.




Chapter 12
Legal Definition of the Concept of Private Productive Investment: An Inter-Comparison Study....... 130
Vasiliki Delitheou, Panteion University, Greece
This paper attempts to analyse the concept of private investment through the regulations and legislations
paying emphasis to the Greek legal system. It also attempts to analyse the whole framework, through an
inter-comparison study, in order to reach some safe conclusions regarding this issue.
Chapter 13
Changes in the Political Culture of Italian Younger Politicians.......................................................... 142
Flaminia Saccà, Tuscia University, Italy
In the last decade, Italy has gone through some deep changes in the political sphere. The fall of the
Berlin Wall had forced political parties from opposite sides to re-organize themselves: their targets,
ideologies and projects. At the same time, these historical events have been shortly followed by a major
national bribe scandal that invested the main political leaders who had governed the Country for half
a century. As a result, the last turn of the past Millennium has left a strongly politicized Country with
no acknowledged leaders, no clear ideologies, no traditional, recognizable parties. It is in those years
that Berlusconi’s new venture gained votes and success. The fracture between political organizations,
leaders and citizens though, became unhealable. The younger generations seemed to be the ones who
suffered the most from political apathy or, worse, distrust. So we wanted to investigate who were the
young politicians who, in these times of crises, had chosen politics as an important part of their lives.
We have carried out two different surveys in different years and we found that political parties were
changing deeply and radically. That their role in the political socialization of young political actors had
become very thin. That candidates began to be chosen amongst the affluent few or, at least, amongst
those whose personal fame and social/professional/family network would guarantee their party at least a
dowry of votes that could make the difference in times of elections. But this method would not guarantee
cohesion nor government stability.
Chapter 14
Social Impact of the Fiscal Crisis Upon the Livelihood Conditions of the Children of Greece.......... 157
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Ioanna Giannopoulou, NHS Community Mental Health of Peristeri, Greece
This paper focuses on the effects of the fiscal crisis, which is assumed as a stressor or traumatic event,
on children’s emotional, physical and developmental well-being. Emphasis is placed on how individual,
family and community risk factors and resources might be critical in increasing children’s psychological
vulnerability in times of such acute crisis. The key issues related to the provision of mental health services
in times of increased pressure put upon them are discussed.




Chapter 15
Social Stigmatization Among Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Male and Female Patients................ 166
Efstratios Papanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Myrsine Roumeliotu, University of the Aegean, Greece
There are about 100 types of human papilloma virus which can affect humans. They can be transmitted
by sexual contact, no sexual contact, or vertically through transmission from the mother to the infant
during delivery and postnatally. More than half of sexually active people will be infected by one or more
HPV viruses during their lifetimes. Many of them will acquire one during adolescence. The majority
of HPV infections are subclinical with subsequent clearance by the immune system. HPV is cleared via
a cell-mediated immune response. Infection with high-risk HPV is the most significant risk factor for
cervical cancer. Estimates of duration of HPV infection are 8 months Median duration of infection for
oncogenic types is estimated to be 13 months and less for nononcogenic HPV types (8 months). Usually
the genital warts have no symptoms. Some times when the warts are large internally, can cause painful
intercourse, urinary retention, or rectal pain. They may be seen on the vulva, vagina, cervix, penis and
scrotum. Both women and men can have involvement of the perineum as well as the anal and oral cavities.
One vaccine is against the two types 16 and 18 (Cervarix), while the other vaccine is against the four
types (quadrivalent): 16, 18, 6 and 11 (Gardasil). The last one is highly effective not only to prevent
cervical vulvar, anal, dysplasia or cancer against cancer 16, and 18 but also is effective to prevent genital
warts related to HPV types 6, 11.
Chapter 16
From Grey to Green: Sustainable Development Perspectives From India-EU Partnerships............... 177
Kiran Prasad, Sri Padmavati Mahila University, India
Environmental sustainability is regarded as the key to the achievement of all other developmental goals.
Environmental issues and the effects of environmental degradation have drawn the attention of policy
makers and the wider community in developing countries like India to impending environmental hazards
and encouraged efforts at the local level by creating awareness and action on green initiatives. These
initiatives have been supported by civil society organizations and international agencies. Local communities
have also assumed custodianship of their environment and natural resources which previously was the
sole responsibility of the government. This chapter focuses on some of India’s efforts to communicate
the green path to sustainable development and the experiences of India-EU partnerships to build mutual
understanding on global environmental issues including climate change. This chapter also analyzes
the growth of development paradigms shaped by community needs and environmental activism for
sustainable development in India.
Chapter 17
The New Paradigm of Corporate Culture............................................................................................ 187
Ksenya Belyaeva, NLMK Group, Russia
Irina Burmykina, Lipetsk State Pedagogical University, Russia
This paper presents an overview of the approach for theoretical conceptualization of the corporate culture
of a large industrial company, incorporating consideration of technologies, values and risks, viewed from
the synergetic and socio-technological perspectives. The concept is grounded on finding the optimal
balance between flexible and rigid practices, as well as planned and spontaneous processes, which have
practical relevance as organizations have a variety of combination and design options.




Section 3
Local Governance, Territorial Planning Policies, Regional Enterprises, and Social
Development
Chapter 18
Doing Business in Greece Within the Wider Context of SMEs Internationalization: A
Benchmarking Approach Between Greece and Selected OECD/EU Member Countries................... 190
Panagiotis Katis, University of the Aegean, Greece
The ability of SMEs to remain entrepreneurially active is important since it not only improves their
competitiveness and hence their entrepreneurial prospects ensuring their viability but it also creates
a positive impact on macro-economic data. However, since domestic markets seem to be saturated,
internationalisation of SMEs comprises a challenging entrepreneurial model that has to be followed by
them in order to overcome potential inherent obstacles (i.e. through identification of promising economies
to activate as well as cooperating with reliable business partners etc.). Within this context there is a series
of parameters that have to be taken into account in order for any SME to internationalise and select the
most promising economies to develop the respective activities. The present study focuses on a spectrum
of such parameters which consist the framework within which domestic SMEs operate and international
SMEs can ‘Internationalise by Doing business’ in Greece and develop their entrepreneurial activity vis-àvis other economies. Hence, Greece’s business profile is analysed on the basis of the regulations, policies
and mechanisms that it has established and operate in order to create an environment as favourable as
possible for international enterprises and their activities in comparison with respective average of OECD
members, as well as with six other European economies (French, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Austria and
Spain). The main parameters of the ‘Doing Business’ model that are applied include: (1) starting a business,
(2) dealing with construction permits, (3) getting electricity, (4) investors’ protection, (5) resolving
insolvency, (6) getting credit, (7) paying taxes. Research results have shown that Greece’s performance
with respect to the above parameters ranked last except from the second and the third parameters where
Greece exhibits a record of a mediocre and a good performance respectively.
Chapter 19
Micro-Enterprise and Micro-Innovation in a Turbulent Era: A Southern European Union
Perspective........................................................................................................................................... 205
Fragkiskos Xirouchakis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Sustainability, local development and regional development are crucial issues in our days. A success factor
for the above is the micro innovation of the micro enterprise. In the present chapter, we are going to focus
on the southern European Union area and more specifically in the case of Greece. The development of
innovative small and medium enterprises in the Greek regions (with emphasis on the region of Crete) is
going to be the key element of sustainability, local development and regional development.
Chapter 20
Housing Submarkets and Future Demographic Developments: A Review on the Literature.............. 216
Dimitris Kyriakidis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Europe is undergoing a profound demographic change. This change will affect significantly all aspects of
modern economies including the demand and the prices of the housing stock. The relationship between
prices of the housing market and associated demographic variables has been long established. However,




in the current literature, the housing market is considered to be unitary and coherent, that is one price
reflects the housing stock without taking into account the housing characteristics which in real economy
are considered essential for price calculation. To this respect it must be noted that housing submarkets
existence has been long established based on the current literature. However and in relation to housing
submarkets, the actual goal of the studies currently exist was the definition process, the models and the
techniques that should be employed in order to acquire best results. Housing submarkets are considered
important in the understanding of different social phenomena. In this paper an attempt is made to review
the relationship of housing prices to demographic variables and then a review on the definition process
of housing submarkets.
Chapter 21
Statistical Analysis of Housing Situation in EU Member States......................................................... 230
Artur Zimny, State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland
Karina Zawieja-Żurowska, State University of Applied Sciences in Konin, Poland
This chapter attempts to analyze the housing market. In particular, it attempts to modelling through a
statistical analysis the housing market in member states of the European Union.
Chapter 22
Examining the Evolution of Agriculture Productivity in the European Union.................................... 240
Olga Gioti-Papadaki, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece
Christos Ladias, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
This paper examines agricultural productivity across 12 Member-States of the European Union. Time
series techniques are employed. The results suggest that there is no uniform pattern across all EU countries.
Few Member-States, nevertheless, follow a common evolution path.
Chapter 23
Participation and in the Aegean Polynesia: Coop Community Challenges at a Time of Acute
Social Crisis......................................................................................................................................... 246
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Eirini Ioanna Vlachopoulou, University of the Aegean, Greece
The EU recognises that islands suffer from disadvantaging external natural and economic circumstances.
As the need for public participation in decision-making increases, in order to address economic and social
cohesion issues, both national and supranational authorities should take action to reinforce community
involvement in policy. This research, using information from case studies from Greek islands, investigates
the obstacles in promoting public participation in insular areas from a European perspective. The study
was based on qualitative research methods and an extensive literature review. In areas with low cohesion,
attempts for participation failed. In other areas, where social cohesion was maintained, there was mistrust
towards local authorities but the members of the community were eager to collaborate with the researcher
to promote participation. It was evident that there is urgency for adoption of national and European
policies focused on the needs of the insular communities, with respect to their unique circumstances.




Chapter 24
Spatial Planning and Regional Growth: A Benchmarking Study for North-South Aegean and 
Crete..................................................................................................................................................... 259
George M. Korres, University of the Aegean, Greece
Gerasimos Pavlogeorgatos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Spatial Planning focuses on planning and management of space, as a core axis towards sustainable
development, as well as harmonious and balanced sustainable development. The term of ‘sustainable
development’ is nowadays used in order to illustrate not only economic, but also social and environmental
sustainable development, pursuing, on the one hand, the improvement of economic indicators, and
on the other hand the improvement of social and environmental indicators. Economic and social data
could present and illustrate the framework of spatial, economic and social conditions, as well growth
and development prospects of a country or region. Nevertheless, comparative analysis of economic,
spatial and social data is considered crucial for any future planning procedures, as well as for any
consideration of the determining factors of both economic and social development. This paper attempts
to analyze spatial planning framework and its contribution towards sustainable regional development.
More precisely, this paper analyses the case studies of the regions of: North Aegean, South Aegean and
Crete. Economic Development is closely related not only with solely economic growth, but also with the
intercalations between a great number of economic determining factors, such as productivity, economic
environment, investments and competitiveness, introducing a major shift from the traditional economic
factors of production. The term of ‘economic development’ is nowadays used in order to illustrate not
only economic growth, but also social and environmental sustainable development, pursuing, on the
one hand, the improvement of economic indicators, and on the other hand the improvement of social
and environmental indicators. Economic and social data could present and illustrate the framework of
spatial, economic and social conditions, as well growth and development prospects of a country or region.
Nevertheless, comparative analysis of economic, spatial and social data is considered crucial for any
future planning procedures, as well as for any consideration of the determining factors of both economic
and social development. This paper attempts to analyze spatial planning framework and its contribution
towards sustainable regional development. More precisely, this paper analyses the case studies of the
region of the North Aegean and South Aegean, especially the islands of Lesvos, Rhodes and Crete.
Chapter 25
Incorporating Social Indicators of Sustainability in Public Policies for Environmentally Degraded
Areas: The Case of the Asopos River.................................................................................................. 297
Marina Proikaki, University of the Aegean, Greece
Nikoleta Jones, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
Nikos Nagopoulos, University of the Aegean, Greece
Maria Chatziantoniou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Olga-Ioanna Kalantzi, University of the Aegean, Greece
Antonis Skouloudis, University of Reading, UK
Konstantinos Evangelinos, University of the Aegean, Greece
This chapter will discuss the incorporation of sustainability indicators in the formation of public policies.
We will focus specifically on policies that aim to tackle environmental degradation from the industry
sector with subsequent socio-economic consequences for the local community and will analyze the area
of the Asopos River in Greece as a case study.




Chapter 26
Social-Ecological Systems in Local Fisheries Communities............................................................... 306
George O. Tsobanoglou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Eirini Ioanna Vlachopoulou, University of the Aegean, Mytilene, Greece
Even though the study of the commons has been expanding rapidly in the past years, and there have
been multiple cases of successful local conservation initiatives, still, significant gaps in knowledge
remain. The Social-Ecological Systems framework attempts to analyse the linkages between the “human
system” (society) and the “natural system” (ecosystems). In every conservation attempt, the interactions
and feedback between the two systems become evident. By examining thoroughly this relationship
through the SES lens, we can develop a deep and holistic understanding of the processes that should
be taken into consideration before the implementation of conservation actions. This study, through the
exploration of the fisheries management procedures in Japan, attempts to develop an understanding of
how the adoption of the Social-Ecological Systems approach could promote local development in the
insular periphery of the developed world, in countries like Greece, where public participation in the
decision-making processes is limited.
Section 4
New Types and Policies of Sustainable Growth: Policy Planning and Applied Research
Chapter 27
Environmental Tax Policy Reforms in the European Union................................................................ 318
Charalambos Louca, American College, USA
This chapter provides an overview of the environmental tax policy system in the European Union. The
different kinds of environmental taxes, their quantitative use in the member states as well as the factors
that influence the potential for tax reforms are explained. Reference is also made as to how environmental
fiscal reforms can contribute to a Green Economy. The principles and the motivational factors for an
Environmental Fiscal Reform (EFR) are explained. The experiences and the practices of European and
Asian countries are presented and policy lessons learnt are drawn. Finally the chapter concludes by
referring to the environmental fiscal reform prospects.
Chapter 28
Mechanisms for the Formation of Tourism Organization Models in Greece Through a
Comparative Analysis of Ten Greek Destinations’ Development....................................................... 330
Sarantakou Efthymia, Hellenic Open University, Greece & Technological Educational
Institute of Athens, Greece
The scope of the chapter is to research and interpret how the organization models of tourism development
have advanced in Greece at traditional, mainly coastal, tourist destinations. Using the notion of organization
models, the chapter examines the size and category of tourism facilities and a series of qualitative
characteristics, as well as the spatial “behavior” of the phenomenon.




Chapter 29
State and Corruption: National and International Aspects, Disparate Management Approaches....... 344
Art. Savidou, University of Neapolis, Cyprus
This chapter attempts to analyze the role of state and corruption through national and international aspects.
Chapter 30
A Framework for Reaching Consensus Under Uncertainty in Multi-Agent Negotiations................... 350
Electra Petracou, University of the Aegean, Greece
Athanasios N. Yannacopoulos, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece
International negotiations often have to be reached and ratified even though the parties involved have
diverging opinions and interests. One of the common protocols used in order to achieved consensus is
to make use of a neutral agent, called the facilitator whose role is to assist the procedure by allowing
communication equally among different parts and initiate the procedure by a proposal which is more
likely to be accepted by all decision makers. A model of this procedure is presented, providing a good
candidate for the initial proposal of the facilitator and quantifying various concepts such as the bargaining
power of each party.
Chapter 31
Efficiency Effects in Supply Chain Management: A Production Frontier Approach.......................... 357
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Explaining the course of technical efficiency and determining factors which might affect it, have been
for a long time, and continue to be, one of the most important topics of economic literature. In response
to this most important question, and with the increase in data availability, economic literature has shown
a resurgence of interest in testing and quantifying various theories of economic growth and explaining
technical efficiency growth. The basic aim of this chapter is the analysis of supply chain management
technical efficiency and benchmark logistic activities, regarding technical efficiency attainment levels.
The related challenge is to define a robust approach towards empirical implementation and defining the
most adequate and reliable methods to put into practice.
Chapter 32
Revisiting the Problem of Regional Allocation of Investment: Aggregate Efficiency or Regional
Equity?................................................................................................................................................. 368
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
This note attempts to rekindle interest on the problem of regional allocation-of-investment and detect
cases of compatibility between two often competitive aims, namely aggregate efficiency and interregional
equity.




Chapter 33
Heterogeneity in Supply Chain Management: An Efficiency Approach............................................. 373
Aikaterini Kokkinou, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Maria-Athina Artavani, Hellenic Military Academy, Greece
Today’s organizations struggle for efficiency and effectiveness. Strategies involving collaboration between
actors and integration of activity chains are reliant of factors that firms do not have direct ownership
and control over. This has implications for strategizing, setting the goals and measuring performance.
Efficiency and effectiveness are often used to describe performance. From a resource dependence
perspective efficiency is defined as an internal standard of performance and effectiveness as an external
standard of fit to various demands. This chapter attempts through a literature survey to search the main
pillars and the determinant factors for efficiency in supply chain management and to present the effects
in the competitiveness and the efficient level for an economy.
Chapter 34
The Production of Cereals in Greece: A Shift-Share Analysis............................................................ 380
Stilianos Alexiadis, Ministry of Reconstruction of Production, Environment, and Energy,
Greece
Stilianos Kokkidis, Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece
Maria Markou, Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Greece
Although there have been numerous studies examining the process of regional economic development using
the Shift-Share analysis, the agricultural sector has received far less attention. One important implication
of this methodology is the possibility to detect groups of regions with certain growth characteristics. This
paper contributes to the literature by applying the technique of Shift-Share over the period 2000-2015
using data for the production of cereals across the 13 regions of Greece. One important conclusion to
emerge is that, in the case of Greek regions, applying the taxonomic procedure of Shift-Share analysis, it
is possible to identify the necessary policies for the improvement of agricultural production in each region.
Compilation of References................................................................................................................ 391
About the Editors............................................................................................................................... 435
Index.................................................................................................................................................... 437


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×