Tải bản đầy đủ

Cost and management accounting fundamentals a southern african approach

Cost and Management Accounting is a comprehensive resource intended for courses which
cover the fundamentals of this subject. The content is aligned to the latest curriculum of the
Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), and deals with the basic concepts
and techniques for the identification and control of costs, as well as general cost management.
Cost and Management Accounting has a strong southern African perspective and covers current
issues on each topic.
The following key features are geared to encourage self-study in students:
• Case studies
• Theory review questions
• Test-yourself questions
• Detailed end-of-chapter exercises.
Extensive support materials include:
• Solutions to exercises in the book
• PowerPoint® slides
• Additional questions and answers.
Written by a group of expert subject specialists using accessible language and engaging formats,
this student-friendly text is a must-have resource for students at universities and universities
of technology, as well as for those following MBA courses and other management accounting
courses.
Support material is available to lecturers at prescribing institutions via the website
www.juta­academic.co.za


www.jutaacademic.co.za

Cost and Management

Accounting

Fundamentals – A southern African approach

Marimuthu | Du Toit | Jodwana
Mungal | Du Plessis | Panicker

About the general editor
Ferina Marimuthu is a Management Accounting lecturer at the Durban University of Technology.
She has extensive lecturing experience in Cost and Management Accounting from basic to
advanced levels which has included lecturing on the Unisa BCompt and CTA programmes. Ferina
takes a keen interest in learning materials development and adding value to students’ learning
experience. She has also been involved with the writing of a variety of accounting textbooks
and acted as reviewer on several books both locally and internationally.

Cost and Management Accounting

Fundamentals – A southern African approach

Fundamentals – A southern African approach

Cost and Management Accounting

General editor: Ferina Marimuthu
Contributing authors: Elda du Toit | Thembinkosi Jodwana
Avika Mungal | Anél du Plessis | Manoj Panicker


Juta Support Material
To access supplementary student and lecturer resources for this title visit the support material web page at
http://jutaacademic.co.za/support-material/detail/cost-and-management-accounting-fundamentals

Student Support
This book comes with the following online resources accessible from the resource page on the
Juta Academic website:




Exam and study skills

Lecturer Support
Lecturer resources are available to lecturers who teach courses where the book is prescribed.
To access the support material, lecturers register on the Juta Academic website and create
a profile. Once registered, log in and click on My Resources.
All registrations are verified to confirm that the request comes from a prescribing lecturer.
This textbook comes with the following lecturer resources:


PowerPoint® slides



Solutions to exercises in the book



Additional questions and answers

Help and Support
For help with accessing support material, email supportmaterial@juta.co.za
For print or electronic desk and inspection copies, email academic@juta.co.za


Cost and Management

Accounting
Fundamentals – A southern African approach
General editor: Ferina Marimuthu
Contributing authors: Elda du Toit, Thembinkosi Jodwana,
Avika Mungal, Anél du Plessis and Manoj Panicker

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 1

2015/10/21 9:34 AM


Cost and Management Accounting
Fundamentals – A southern African approach
First published 2015
Print first published in 2015
Juta and Company (Pty) Ltd
First Floor
Sunclare Building
21 Dreyer Street
Claremont
7708
PO Box 14373, Lansdowne 7779, Cape Town, South Africa
© 2015 Juta & Company (Pty) Ltd
ISBN 978 1 48511 190 0 (Print)
ISBN 978 1 48511 540 3 (WebPDF)
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information
storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Subject to
any applicable licensing terms and conditions in the case of electronically supplied
publications, a person may engage in fair dealing with a copy of this publication for his or her
personal or private use, or his or her research or private study. See section 12(1)(a) of the
Copyright Act 98 of 1978.
Project manager: Seshni Kazadi
Editor: Michelle Savage
Proofreader: Robyn Hoepner
Typesetter: Trace Digital Services
Cover designer: Monique Cleghorn
The author and the publisher believe on the strength of due diligence exercised that this work
does not contain any material that is the subject of copyright held by another person. In the
alternative, they believe that any protected pre-existing material that may be comprised in it
has been used with appropriate authority or has been used in circumstances that make such
use permissible under the law.


Contents
About the authors��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� xi
How to use this book�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������xiii
Foreword������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� xv
Acknowledgements���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� xvi
1 The context of management accounting������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 1

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2
Definition of management accounting�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2
The purpose of management accounting���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������2
Comparison of financial accounting and management accounting���������������������������������������������3
The link between cost accounting, financial accounting and management accounting����������������4
Characteristics of good information������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5
Non-financial information������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5
Financial information requirements for different types of organisations�����������������������������������������6
Commercial organisations�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
Public organisations�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
Societies or non-profit organisations����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
Environmental management accounting�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
The management accountant������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7
The role of management accountants����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7
The positioning of the management accountant within an organisation�����������������������������������������8
The management accountant as a dedicated business partner������������������������������������������������������8
The management accountant as an advisor����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������9
Shared service centre���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������9
Business process outsourcing�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������9
Ethics and professional standards in management accounting���������������������������������������������������������10
The background of the CIMA����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������10
The role of CIMA in developing the practice of management accounting��������������������������������������11
CIMA qualification����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������11
Chartered Global Management Accountants�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������11
Summary�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12
Test yourself solutions�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������13
Additional resource����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17
Reference list����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17

2 Basic cost accounting, cost classification, behaviour and
estimation��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19
Introduction�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19
Cost and related terms�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20
Cost classification�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20
Direct and indirect costs�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 3

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


iv
Manufacturing and non-manufacturing costs���������������������������������������������������������������������������������21
Product and period costs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������22
Classification by cost behaviour�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������23
Classification for decision making�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������26
Cost estimation�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������29
High-low method�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������30
Scatter graph method������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������30
Least squares method (regression analysis)���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������31
Total cost statement���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������33
Summary�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������35
Test yourself solutions�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������36
Additional resource����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������44
Reference list����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������44

3 Inventory management and control������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������45
Introduction�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������46
Material recording process���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������46
Inventory valuation����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������47
Periodic inventory system����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������48
Perpetual inventory system��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������52
Inventory variances between financial and manual records����������������������������������������������������������55
Inventory management systems������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������55
Economic order quantity������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������56
Re-order point�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������59
Maximum inventory holding����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������59
Minimum inventory holding����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������59
Stock ledger cards�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������60
Material Requirement Planning�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������60
Just-in-Time�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������61
Accounting entries in a manufacturing organisation���������������������������������������������������������������������������62
Purchasing of inventory items��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������62
Issuing of inventory items����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������63
Summary�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������63
Test yourself solutions�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������65
Additional resource����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������71
Reference list����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������71

4 Labour cost and control�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������73
Introduction�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������74
Labour cost control����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������74
Payroll accounting������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������74
Methods of remuneration����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������75
Wage incentive schemes���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������76
Rowan premium���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������76
Halsey premium����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������76
Halsey-Weir premium������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������76
Calculating the remuneration���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������78
Normal deductions����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������78
Organisation allowances������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������79
Overtime�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������79
Direct and indirect labour����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������81
Labour recovery rate���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������82
Accounting entries������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������84
Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 4

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


v
Summary�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������85
Test yourself solutions�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������86
Additional resource����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������92
Reference list����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������92

5 Manufacturing overheads�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������93

Introduction�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������93
Overheads in a manufacturing organisation�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Manufacturing overheads����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Non-manufacturing overheads�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Allocation and apportionment of manufacturing overheads ������������������������������������������������������������94
Primary allocation and apportionment����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Secondary allocation and apportionment ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������98
Predetermined overhead rate�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������98
Absorption of manufacturing overheads���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 100
Under- or over-absorbed overheads�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 100
Accounting entries��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 103
Activity-based costing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 105
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 110
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 111
Additional resource������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 119
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 119

6 Job costing and the flow of manufacturing cost���������������������������������������������������������������� 121

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 121
Job costing and batch costing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 122
Job costing procedures�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 122
Flow of documents�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 123
The flow of costs in a production facility���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 124
Total cost of a job ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 124
Accounting entries for job costing and manufacturing cost flow��������������������������������������������������� 127
Statement of cost of goods manufactured and sold��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 131
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 136
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 137
Additional resources������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 143
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 143

7 Construction contract costing�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 145

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 145
What is a construction contract?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 146
Accounting for construction contracts�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 146
Cost flows within a contract��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 147
Revenue flows within a contract�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 148
Profit recognition within an accounting period���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 150
Accounting entries�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 152
Construction contracts in practice���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 160
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 161
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 164
Additional resources������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 170
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 170

8 Process costing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 171
Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 172

Contents

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 5

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


vi
Cost flows and unit costs��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 172
Process cost report��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 176
Incomplete units and equivalent production��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 176
Incomplete units in opening inventory�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 177
Weighted average method������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 177
The FIFO method���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 179
Spoilage (normal and abnormal)������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 183
Treatment of normal loss�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 183
Abnormal loss and gain����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 187
The short-cut method in process costing���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 192
Conditions for using the short-cut method ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 193
The process account and related entries������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 195
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 197
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 198
Additional resources������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 209
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 209

9 Budgets���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 211

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 211
The purpose and importance of budgeting������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 212
Strategic planning, budgetary planning and operational planning����������������������������������������� 212
What is a budget?����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 213
The budgeting process�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 213
The budget period��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 214
The budget committee������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 214
The budget manual������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 214
The preparation of budgets����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 214
The inter-relationships of budgets���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 215
Using computers to prepare budgets����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 215
The master budget�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 215
The sales budget������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 219
The production budget������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 220
The cost of goods manufactured budget���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 220
The selling and administrative expenses budget��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 223
The master budget (or budgeted statement of comprehensive income)��������������������������������� 224
The cash budget������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 225
The budgeted statement of financial position������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 226
An alternative cash budget example������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 229
Approaches to budgeting��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 232
Participative budgeting������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 233
Rolling budgets�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 233
Incremental budgeting������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 233
Zero-based budgeting��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 233
Budgetary control information���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 234
Budget centres���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 234
Budgetary control reports������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 235
Fixed and flexible budgets�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 235
Preparing a flexible budget������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 235
The total budget variance�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 237
Using budgets as a basis for rewards������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 239
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 239
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 241
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 256
Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 6

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


vii
10 Standard costing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 257

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 257
What is a standard cost?����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 258
The operation of a standard costing system����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 258
Purposes of standard costing�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 258
Performance levels��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 259
Ideal standard����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 259
Attainable standard������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 259
Current standard����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 259
Setting standard costs��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 260
Material standards�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 260
Labour standards����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 260
Overhead standards ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 260
Standard costing in the modern business environment�������������������������������������������������������������������� 261
Flexible budgets and the total budget variance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 262
What is variance analysis?�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 262
Variable cost variances�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 264
Direct material variances��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 265
Direct labour variances������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 269
Variable overhead variances���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 271
Fixed overhead variances��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 273
Sales variances���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 275
Reconciliation of variances������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 277
Working backwards with variances��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 278
The inter-relationship of variances���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 281
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 281
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 282
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 290

11 Integrated and interlocking accounting systems������������������������������������������������������������ 291

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 291
An integrated accounting system������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 292
Accounting entries applicable to an integrated accounting system����������������������������������������� 292
Basic cost variances������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 298
An interlocking accounting system��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 299
Accounting entries applicable to an interlocking accounting system������������������������������������� 299
Reconciliation between cost and financial accounts�������������������������������������������������������������������� 302
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 307
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 308
Additional resources������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 318
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 318

12 Direct and absorption costing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 319

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 319
Comparing direct and absorption costing concepts��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 320
Direct and absorption costing statements of comprehensive income������������������������������������������� 321
Differences in profit������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 323
Direct and absorption costing methods and inventory valuation ������������������������������������������� 324
Reconciliation of the difference in profit ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 328
Direct costing versus absorption costing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 330
Advantages of direct costing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 330

Contents

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 7

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


viii
Disadvantages of direct costing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 331
Advantages of absorption costing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 331
Disadvantages of absorption costing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 331
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 331
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 332
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 342

13 Cost-volume-profit analysis���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 343

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 343
Assumptions of the CVP analysis������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 344
The contribution income statement������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 344
Contribution������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 345
Contribution per unit�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 345
Contribution margin ratio������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 345
Break-even point������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 347
Margin of safety�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 349
Target profit analysis����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 351
Algebraic approaches to the CVP analysis��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 352
The break-even graph���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 353
Profit/volume graph������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 355
The ‘what if ’ analysis����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 357
Limitations of a CVP analysis������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 358
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 358
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 359
Additional resource������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 368
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 368

14 Decision making�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 369

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 369
Relevant and irrelevant costs��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 369
Discretionary costs�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 370
Opportunity cost����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 371
Sunk cost������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 371
Avoidable and unavoidable costs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 371
Joint products and by-products��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 371
Physical measures method������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 373
Sales value at the split-off point method���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 373
Net realisable value at split-off point method������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 374
Constant gross profit percentage method�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 375
Joint cost allocations for decision making�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 376
Accounting for by-products���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 378
Scrap and waste�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 380
Make-or-buy decisions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 380
Limiting factors affecting production���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 383
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 386
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 387
Additional resource������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 396
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 396

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 8

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


ix
15 Pricing decisions������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 397

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 397
Demand and the product life cycle���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 398
Price elasticity of demand�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 398
Factors affecting price elasticity�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 400
The product life cycle���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 400
The introductory phase����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 401
Growth phase����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 402
Maturity phase��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 402
Decline phase������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 402
The profit maximisation model��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 402
Limitations of the profit maximising model���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 403
Pricing strategies based on cost���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 404
Establishing percentage mark-ups���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 404
Cost-plus pricing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 404
Return on investment pricing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 405
Market-based pricing strategies���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 406
Target costing and pricing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 406
Other pricing strategies������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 407
Penetration pricing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 407
Price skimming�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 408
Premium pricing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 408
Price differentiation������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 408
Loss leader pricing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 408
Product bundling���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 408
Discount pricing ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 408
Controlled pricing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 409
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 409
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 410
Additional resource������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 414
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 414

16 Investment appraisal����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 415

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 415
Some principles underlying investment appraisal������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 416
Assumptions underlying investment appraisal decisions ����������������������������������������������������������������� 416
Investment appraisal process�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 416
Screening stage��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 416
Search stage��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 416
Information acquisition stage������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 417
Authorisation stage������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 417
Financing stage�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 417
Implementation stage�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 417
Investment appraisal techniques�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 418
Payback method������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 418
Discounted payback method�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 420
Accounting rate of return method���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 421
Net present value method������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 422
Compounding���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 422
Discounting�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 423
Project evaluation���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 425
Equivalent annual value model��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 428

Contents

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 9

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


x
Internal rate of return�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 429
Sensitivity analysis and investment appraisal��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 431
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 431
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 432
Additional resource������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 439
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 439

17 Management information������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 441

Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 411
Management reports����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 411
Budgets and variance reports������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Contribution format income statement����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Projected financial statements����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Balanced scorecard�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Responsibility centres��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Cost centre���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 442
Revenue centre��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 443
Profit centre�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 443
Investment centre���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 443
Financial statements that inform management���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 443
Gross revenue����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 443
Contribution������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 443
Gross margin ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 444
Value added��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 444
Expenses: Marketing, selling and administration������������������������������������������������������������������������� 444
Return on capital employed��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 444
Management information in a service organisation��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 446
Management information in non-profit organisations��������������������������������������������������������������������� 447
Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 449
Test yourself solutions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 450
Additional resources������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 455
Reference list������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 455

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 10

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


About
Aboutthe
theauthors
authors
Ferina Marimuthu is a Management Accounting lecturer at the Durban University of
Technology. She has extensive lecturing experience in Cost and Management Accounting
from the basic up to the advanced level, which has also included lecturing on the Unisa
BCompt and CTA programmes. Her qualifications include a Master’s in Business
Administration from the University of Durban Westville, where she was also awarded the
Outstanding Management Accounting Student award. Ferina takes a keen interest in
learning materials development and adding value to students’ learning experience in the
classroom through the use of innovative teaching and learning methods. She has also coauthored on a book titled Basic Accounting for non-accountants, published by Van Schaik.
Ferina was also the general editor on Cost and Management Accounting, published by Juta. She
has been a reviewer on several books, both locally and internationally, including the fourth
edition of Management Accounting by Professor Will Seal, published by McGraw-Hill.
Anél du Plessis has worked as a shaft accountant in the mining industry and as a project
accountant within the engineering field. She has been teaching full time at the Vaal
University of Technology for five years with experience of Cost and Management Accounting
from first year up to B-Tech level. Anél has completed her Master’s Degree in Management
Accounting at the North West University and has published research within the
Environmental Accounting field. 
Avika Mungal is a lecturer in the Department of Management Accounting at the Durban
University of Technology. Her qualifications include a Bachelor’s Degree in Technology:
Cost and Management Accounting, as well as a Master’s Degree in Technology: Cost and
Management Accounting. She has presented papers on Teaching, Learning and Assessment
at various symposiums. She has also published research articles in both accredited and nonaccredited international journals. Her future plans include engagement in research towards
pursuing her Doctorate.
Elda du Toit is a senior lecturer in the Department of Financial Management at the
University of Pretoria. She has been a lecturer for more than ten years and also presents a
short course on cost and management accounting. She obtained her DCom degree in 2012
and is actively involved in research. She is also an academic Professional Accountant
(PA[SA]) and Associate Chartered Management Accountant (ACMA/CGMA). She has coauthored numerous undergraduate financial textbooks.
Manoj Panicker is the Head of Department of Accounting at Walter Sisulu University
(WSU), Butterworth campus. Before he became the Head of Department he was a Financial
Manager at the Enterprise Development Centre (EDC), a unit within WSU. Prior to that, he
was a senior lecturer in the School of Accounting, lecturing Management Accounting,
Financial Management and related subjects. He is an Associate Member of the Chartered

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 11

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


xii
Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) (2013). He also holds a Master of Business
Leadership (MBL) degree (2002) from the University of South Africa. He has served the
profession, academia and industry for a period covering 23 years. He has developed
considerable first-hand experience in the challenges associated with the development and
implementation of budgetary processes and procedures for the Faculty of Business
Management Sciences and Law at WSU. He managed finances of two multi-million rand
projects with EDC. His research interests are in the areas of strategic management
accounting and financial performance of SMEs.
Thembinkosi Jodwana is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Applied Accounting at
the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU). He has occupied various positions
in commerce and industry, one of which was as Export Accountant for a famous FMCG
company. He holds a BCom (Rhodes), HDE (Rhodes), MTech (NMMU) and Post Graduate
Diploma in Applied Ethics (Stellenbosch University). He lectures Cost and Management
Accounting to first and third year National Diploma Accounting students and Project
Management to BTech students. He is a member of the South African Institute of
Professional Accountants (SAIPA).

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 12

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


xiii

How to use this book
Mind maps – Each chapter begins with a mind map which creates a mental image of the
chapter helping you to focus on the parts that are important.
Learning objectives – These follow on from the mind maps introducing topics covered
and summarise what you should have learnt by the end of the chapter. You can use these to
view the key issues that are covered in the chapter. You can also test yourself at the end of
each chapter to see if these learning objectives have been realised.
Illustrative case studies – Each chapter contains a South African-based case study with
questions. These allow you to apply your understanding of the concepts, issues and techni­
ques within a broader organisational context.
Illustrative examples – The key areas in management accounting have been clearly
explained using illustrative examples. These examples are concise and focus on a particular
key concept within the chapter.
Test yourself questions with solutions – Each learning outcome consists of a test yourself
question which enables you to check your understanding and identify the areas in which
you need to do further work. The solutions to these questions appear at the end of the
chapter.
Summaries – Pull together the key points addressed in the chapter to provide a useful
reminder of the topics covered. The summary links with the learning outcomes of each
chapter.
Key concepts – Each chapter concludes with a list of the main concepts defined, explained
and illustrated in the chapter.
Review questions – Short questions which encourage you to review and critically discuss
your understanding of the main topics and issues covered in each chapter.
Exercises – This section of the chapter consists of 12 exercises beginning with a crossword
puzzle leading on to a set of multiple-choice questions, thereafter on to a set of comprehensive
questions mostly adapted from CIMA examinations. The inclusion of professional
questions will prepare students with the required level of competency necessary to sit some
of the professional examinations. The ability to understand these questions will indicate a
high level of understanding of the topic. Fully worked solutions to the exercises are available
on the website to institutions that prescribe this book.
Weblinks – Provide an annotated guide to useful websites relevant to each chapter.

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 13

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


xiv
Lecturer supplements
Complete, downloadable Instructor’s Manual with solutions to the end of the chapter
exercises.
●● Additional questions and solutions on each chapter consisting of Crossword puzzles,
Match the column, True or false, Fill in the blanks, Multiple-choice questions and Short
questions.
●● Suggested solutions to all illustrative case study problems.
●● Editable PowerPoint® slides organised by chapter, allowing you to provide a lecture or
seminar presentation and/or print handouts.
●●

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 14

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


xv

Foreword
So, you are now at the introductory level of your cost and management accounting studies.
For a moment, let’s look into your future … after graduation, when you might be applying
for a job as a cost and management accountant.
Most job descriptions in the profession call for a specific skills set aligned to the requirements
of the role and organisation. These skills include analytical skills, discipline, planning and
strategy development, control of resources, interpreting financial and economic data and
decision-making. Above all, the job will require an interest in working with numbers, as well
as technical accounting and finance skills.
In addition, however, softer skills will be necessary: communication skills, presentation
skills, the ability to persuade or convince, interpersonal skills, leadership skills and people
management. These skills are essential for cost accountants to perform their roles with
professionalism and integrity.
All these skills enable a cost and management accountant to see the organisation’s big
picture and to help the company’s owner or its directors make decisions that will ensure the
organisation’s success. It’s a big role to step into eventually.
So it is for this very reason that when we were deciding on the make-up and structure of the
Cost and Management Accounting Fundamentals textbook we considered the profession and the
environment in which you will eventually operate. We believe that as a cost and management
accounting student you need to grow into the role of an accountant by first learning the
fundamentals of the discipline and then applying that knowledge. The key is how the
fundamentals are learnt. This is where Cost and Management Accounting Fundamentals makes
the difference.
The textbook covers the new CIMA syllabus (effective 2015) and lays a solid foundation for
the key concepts and most important areas of focus in cost and management accounting
today. The topics are clearly presented and the text show the logical development of
concepts. Concise explanations and related examples illustrate how the concepts are
applied, and mini case studies, and particularly scenarios that depict the unique southern
African perspective, are threaded throughout each chapter. With our insight into how
students learn at an introductory level, we specifically included extensive self-study
opportunities throughout the textbook, such as review questions, test-yourself questions
and end-of-chapter exercises. Our intention is to encourage self-study and more importantly
to harness an attitude of always learning, which the profession also requires.
We have presented the content you require in your course, balanced with the competencies
you will need, which mirrors CIMA’s approach in their syllabus. So, even though this is your
first step towards a career as a future cost and management accountant, we hope that it is a
firm foothold and one that ensures that you are future-enabled for the cost and management
accounting profession.
THE AUTHORS
October 2015

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 15

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


Acknowledgements
The authors and publisher gratefully acknowledge permission to reproduce copyright
material in this book. Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders, but if any
copyright infringements have been made, the publisher would be grateful for information
that would enable any omissions or errors to be corrected in subsequent impressions.
Brand names in case studies: used with permission of ABSA, Standard Bank SA and Nedbank
SA; Adapted content in case study: ‘Ace Fertilizer Company: Ethical Cost Allocations and
Price Determination.’ Jerry Kreuze, Western Michigan University, IMA Educational Case
Journal, ISSN 1940-204X, Volume 2, Issue 3 ©2014, CIMA. All rights reserved; Used by
permission ‘Impala Platinum ’, CGMA case study from: Management Accounting principles drive
20% lower costs than peers. Leon van Schalkwyk FCMA, CGMA, ©2014, CIMA. All rights
reserved; Case study used by permission: Mastercraft http://www.mastercraft.com; Case study
used by permission: ’GM SA plant still closed as strike continues’ Jul 07 2014 12:02 © Fin24.
iab. South Africa. July 14, 2014; Case study used by permission: ‘Carmakers hit by South
African metalworkers strike’, by Andrew England, © Financial Times; Case study adapted
from ‘Forget the ‘China price’ - what’s the ‘China cost’? October 6, 2008, by Glenn Cheney.
Accounting Today © Source MediaSource. All rights reserved. http://www.accountingtoday.
com/ato_issues/2008_18/29239-1.html; Unpublished MCom Dissertation by S.W. Sabela
2012: ‘An evaluation of the most prevalent budgeting practice in the South African business
community’, © 2012 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved; Case study using Project
Report: ‘Costing the South African Public Library and Information Services Bill’, Department
of Arts and Culture, Pretoria, SA, August 2013; Case study: ‘What is an Integrated Accounting
System?’ by Paul Cole-Ingait, Demand Media © Copyright 2015 Hearst Newspapers, LLC;
Case study: ‘Factors influencing effective cost management within South Africa’s retail
banking sector’. Mistry. K.S. Research project submitted to the Gordon Institute of Business
Science, University of Pretoria. An MBA requirement. 10 November 2010 http://repository.
up.ac.za/bitstream/handle/2263/24703/dissertation.pdf?sequence=1 Kirtan Shirishkumar
Mistry 29686131; Case study: ‘kulula.com: Making you want to fly’, 2010 © and permission
of Professor Colin Diggines; Astrapak case study: ‘Strike action dents Astrapak H1 earnings,
Engineering News. 19 September 2014, edited by Chanel de Bruyn, Creamer Media Senior
Deputy Editor Online; Mercedes Benz case study: © 1997–2015, Institute of Management
Accountants, Inc; Springwater case study: © 2012-15 Great Ideas for Teaching Marketing.
Geoff Fripp; Fry Group Food case study from: © 2012 Business and Marketing Cases. Juta.

Cost Management Acc_Chap 00 Prelims.indd 16

2015/10/20 12:42 PM


1

The context of
management accounting
Purpose of management
accounting

Financial vs management
accounting

The importance of
information
Management accounting
Environmental
management accounting

The management
accountant

The role of CIMA

Learning objectives
After studying this chapter, you should be able to:
●● understand the concept of management accounting
●● identify the differences between financial and management accounting
●● explain the role of the management accountant in an organisation
●● explain the financial information requirements for companies, public organisations
and societies
●● understand the importance of ethics
●● understand the role of CIMA as a professional body.

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 1

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


2

Introduction
Management accounting focuses on providing relevant information to managers, the
key personnel within an organisation who plan, organise, direct and control operations.
Management accounting provides essential information in a variety of reports, which
managers analyse and interpret in order to make informed decisions.
In contrast, financial accounting focuses on providing information to shareholders,
investors, creditors and others who are outside an organisation. Financial accounting pro­
vides statements on an organisation’s past performance, which are then used by outsiders
to determine how well the organisation is performing.
This chapter addresses the meaning and purpose of management accounting, the
role of management accountants and the role of the Chartered Institute of Management
Accountants (CIMA) as a professional body for management accountants.

Definition of management accounting
Management accounting is the process of preparing management reports that provide
accurate and timely financial and statistical information required by management to make
decisions. It is also used to plan and control an organisation’s activities. CIMA defines
management accounting as: ‘the application of the principles of accounting and financial
management to create, protect, preserve and increase value for the stakeholders of for-profit
and not-for-profit enterprises in the public and private sectors’. (Source: CIMA)

The purpose of management accounting
The purpose of management accounting is to provide useful information to management,
which is used to assist them in planning, directing, motivating and controlling the
opera­
tions. Management accounting is an integral part of management’s role and
contributes largely to the success of any organisation. Management accounting requires
the identification, generation, presentation and interpretation of relevant information. It
assists in making strategic decisions, planning operations, determining capital structure and
sourcing funding, and measuring and reporting financial and non-financial performance
to management. Furthermore, the information provided by the management accounting
process is essential for operational control, ensuring that resources are used effectively,
and that corporate governance procedures, risk management and internal controls are
implemented correctly.
Planning involves setting the objectives of an organisation and formulating strategies to
achieve those objectives. Planning is done at different levels:
●● Strategic, or long-term planning performed by top management
●● Managerial, or short- to medium-term planning done by middle management
●● Operational, or short-term planning for daily operations.
Decision making involves analysing the information provided and making informed
decisions, usually by choosing between two or more alternatives. Managers rely on accurate
information to compare each alternative and assess its impact on the organisation. The
management accountant is responsible for providing the information on which these
decisions are based.
Control entails evaluating the organisation’s performance by comparing actual
results with targets. The differences between actual results and targets can be reported
Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 2

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


3
to management so that they can improve the control of their operations. Some common
performance measures are:
●● variances, which compare actual results against budgeted results
●● profitability, which may be measured using gross profit, net profit or gross margin
percentage
●● returns, which are measured by means of ratios such as return on capital.
Management accounting provides information to assist with the following tasks:
Planning: As part of the planning process, management considers the effects of revenue
and expenditure. Management accounting information is important in estimating these
effects. Budgeting is also part of the planning process. Management accountants collect,
analyse and summarise data for management to use in the preparation of budgets.
●● Decision making: Management accountants collect, analyse and interpret data which
is submitted to management in the form of reports. These reports enable management
to make informed decisions. Management accounting data, such as daily sales reports,
are often used in day-to-day decision making.
●● Controlling and monitoring: Performance reports which compare budgeted and
actual results are prepared by management accountants. If actual performance falls
below the target, management is alerted so that appropriate control actions can be
taken. Providing this kind of feedback to management is one of the main purposes of
management accounting.
●● Motivating: Motivating involves mobilising staff to carry out plans and run day-today activities. Managers need to motivate and direct their staff effectively to keep the
organisation functioning efficiently. Management accounting data, such as daily sales
reports, budgets and performance reports, are a measure of a division’s or organisation’s
performance in relation to its objectives, and can be used to motivate and encourage
staff to work smarter or more efficiently.
●●

Test yourself 1.1
Briefly discuss the different levels of planning.

Comparison of financial accounting and management accounting
Stakeholders, such as shareholders, investors, creditors etc. who are external to the
organisation, use financial accounting reports. Managers within the organisation use
management accounting reports for internal use. Even though both financial and
management accounting often depend on the same basic financial data, the contrast in basic
orientation results in a number of major differences between financial and management
accounting. These differences are summarised in Table 1.1.
Table 1.1 Comparison of financial accounting and management accounting
Financial accounting

Management accounting

External focus: reports to those outside the
organisation such as shareholders, lenders, tax
authorities and regulators.

Internal focus: reports to those inside the
organisation for planning, decision making,
controlling and performance evaluation.



➤➤
The context of management accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 3

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


4
Emphasis is on historical data

Emphasis is on future decisions

Objectivity of data is emphasised

Relevance is emphasised

Precise information is required

Timely information is required

Must follow GAAP

Need not follow GAAP

Summarised data for the entire organisation
is prepared

Detailed reports about different departments
and functions are prepared

Mandatory for external reports

Not mandatory

Governed by many rules and regulations

Not governed by rules and regulations

Test yourself 1.2
The following characteristics relate to either management or financial accounting.
Indicate to which each characteristic relates:
(a) Externally focused
(b) Not a mandatory requirement
(c) Assists in planning and decision making
(d) Aimed at shareholders and investors
(e) Governed by rules and regulations

The link between cost accounting, financial accounting and
management accounting
Accounting is concerned with the accumulation of data for internal and external reporting.
The three areas of accounting are financial accounting, cost accounting and management
accounting.
Financial accounting is the process employed to communicate the financial information
of an organisation to various parties interested in its progress. One of the main objectives
of financial accounting is to report on an organisation’s profitability and to provide
information about its financial position. The information presented in financial accounting
statements is used primarily to ascertain the performance of an organisation and to make
important investment or divestment decisions.
Cost accounting involves accounting for costs and is used for determining an organisa­
tion’s profitability and for decision making. It includes the accounting for all income
and expenditure, and preparation of periodical statements and reports, with the aim of
determining and controlling costs. Cost accounting helps management by directing their
attention towards inefficient operations and assisting with the day-to-day control of
business activities. Cost accounting information is used in both financial and management
accounting.
Management accounting is a systematic approach to assist in managerial decision
making. It generates information for establishing plans and controls, while also providing a
system of setting standards and targets, and reporting variances between planned and actual
performances for corrective actions. Management accounting is the process of identifying,
measuring, analysing, preparing, interpreting and communicating financial information to
management. This information is used to plan, evaluate and control activities, enabling the

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 4

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


5
organisation to achieve its objectives. Management accounting consists of cost accounting,
budgetary and inventory controls, statistical measures, internal appraisals and reporting.

Characteristics of good information
Organisations generate enormous quantities of data just through carrying out their
normal daily activities. This data consists of basic facts and figures. The data is then
processed into a useful form which is known as information. Good information is needed
to make good decisions. Characteristics of good information can be easily remembered
using the acronym ACCURATE.
A – Accurate: The degree of accuracy varies, depending on the reason for which the
information is needed. For example, when calculating the cost of a unit of output, managers
may want the cost to be accurate to the nearest rand or cent.
C – Complete: Managers require all relevant information before making decisions. For
example, a variance report should include all relevant standard and actual costs to understand
the variance calculation.
C – Cost beneficial: Management information becomes valuable when it assists in decision
making. The cost of generating information should not exceed the value of it.
U – Understandable: Limited use of jargon and technical language improves under­stand­
ability of information. Care should be taken in the way in which financial information is
presented to non–financial managers.
R – Relevant: Only relevant information should be included in the report. The information
should be relevant to its purpose.
A – Authoritative: Information should be included from a reliable source so that the users
can have assurance in the decision-making process.
T – Timely: Information should be readily available to a manager so that he or she can
make decisions based on that information.
E – Easy to use: Information should be easy to use and accessible to the person using it.


Source: CIMA (adapted)

Non-financial information
Management requires both financial and non-financial information for decision making.
Although financial information – such as costs and profit – is important, non-financial
information is also needed – such as the number of orders processed and the number of
complaints received. Management accounting systems are capable of obtaining both
financial and non-financial information.

Test yourself 1.3
Identify the characteristics of good information. Choose all that apply.
(a) Cost beneficial
(b) Accurate
(c) Accountable
(d) Complete


➤➤

The context of management accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 5

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


6
(e) Regular
(f) Timely
(g) Detailed
(h) Understandable



Source: CIMA (adapted)

Financial information requirements for different types of
organisations
The financial information requirement may vary depending on the users and their needs.
Let us look at different types of organisations and their information needs below.

Commercial organisations
The prime objective of commercial organisations is usually to maximise shareholder
wealth. The type of information required by this type of organisation includes costing of
departments and products, profit measurement and return on capital.
Shareholders are interested in the growth of their investment and they use the financial
statements to evaluate the organisation’s performance. Shareholders are also interested in
the level of dividend payments.

Public organisations
The main objective of public organisations is to provide services to the public, in line
with government requirements. The information requirement of public organisations
is different from commercial organisations, in that public organisations are non-profit
entities and their focus should be on cost management. Accurate and detailed information
is required for these organisations to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of their
operations. Their objective, which is evaluated by the government and public, is public
service delivery.

Societies or non-profit organisations
Societies or non-profit organisations (NPOs) require financial information relating to
their activities. They will also be interested in the impact that organisations have on local
communities. These types of organisations also find environmental reporting of good use
to the public since it measures and reports on the impact that organisations have on the
environment.

Environmental management accounting
Environmental management accounting (EMA) involves the production and study of
both financial and non-financial information, in order to support internal environmental
management processes. Organisations are under growing pressure to reduce their environ­
mental impact and therefore, it is important for them to understand the costs associated
in dealing with this problem. Management can often be unaware of the magnitude of
environmental costs and may not be able to identify opportunities for cost savings.

Cost and Management Accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 6

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


7
EMA can be applied in the assessment of environmental costs, product pricing,
budgeting and investment appraisal, and the setting of quantified performance targets.
Environmental costs may be incurred for a number of reasons – they may be regulatory
costs or compliance costs – and can result in expenditure to meet legal or regulatory
requirements.
There are also voluntary costs, where an organisation undertakes environmental
spending on its own initiative, either for social or for business reasons. For example, some
environmentally friendly operations may create goodwill or satisfy customer expectations
through investing in beneficial environmental initiatives.
Environmental costs can be split into two categories: internal costs and external costs.
Internal costs impact directly on the profit of an organisation. There are many different
types, for example, improved systems and checks in order to avoid penalties, waste disposal
costs, product take-back costs and regulatory costs, such as taxes.
External costs are imposed on society at large, but not borne by the organisation that
generates the costs, e.g. the costs of carbon emissions, energy and water usage, health care
and social welfare. However, some governments are becoming increasingly aware of these
external costs and are implementing measures to convert them to internal costs by means
of taxes and regulations.

Test yourself 1.4
Identify internal costs and external costs from the following list:
(a) Water disposal costs
(b) Health care costs
(c) Carbon emissions costs
(d) Regulatory costs
(e) Social welfare costs
(f) Product take-back costs

The management accountant
Management accountants play a crucial role in any organisation, by providing a variety
of information to management, which assists them in planning, controlling and decision
making. Management accountants often hold senior positions in an organisation.

The role of management accountants
The role of management accountants is changing from that of reporting performance to
enhancing performance. Traditionally, management accountants were mainly involved in
reporting business results to management; but today, management accountants are seen
as value-adding partners of an organisation. They are expected to forecast the future of
the business, as well as identify opportunities for enhancing organisational performance.
Nowadays, management accountants along with business managers, function as mentors,
advisors and drivers of performance.

The context of management accounting

Cost Management Acc_Chap 01.indd 7

2015/10/20 12:43 PM


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay

×